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Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2006) 2 (3): 1–21.
Published: 01 November 2006
...Cyrus Schayegh This article analyzes one of the first book-length Iranian treatises on female criminality, Qadisih Hijāzi’s Barrisi-yi jarā’im-i zan dar Irān (1962), to show how in the eyes of contemporary Iranian cultural critics and social scientists, female criminality was prefigured by gender...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2015) 11 (3): 283–305.
Published: 01 November 2015
... marriage. In divorces based on forced or premature consummation, colonial medical and legal discourses that infantilized Muslim women and criminalized Muslim men created new pathways for women to escape abusive marriages. Conversely, women’s divorce suits based on nonconsummation were weakened by French...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2017) 13 (3): 376–394.
Published: 01 November 2017
... of the women had distracted shop assistants by bargaining to buy the fabric, while the fourth stole from the most expensive sections in each store. ʿEid and al-Simbawi had substantial criminal records for theft, so the judge sentenced them to a special reform institute for an unlimited period. The...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2018) 14 (2): 252–254.
Published: 01 July 2018
... and men who have sex with men, especially if they are penetrated, or those who express feminine embodiments, do not have such privileges. Instead, the society debases, criminalizes, and punishes them in contemporary Egypt. The police in the General Directorate for Protecting Public Morality...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2018) 14 (2): 230–232.
Published: 01 July 2018
... medical residency as a psychiatrist. Their lives unexpectedly intersect at the hospital when Elmas is placed under Şehnaz’s care as a catatonic patient and criminal suspect. Elmas’s husband and mother-in-law died under vague circumstances on the same stormy night. The prominent film writer and director...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2013) 9 (1): 140–141.
Published: 01 March 2013
... writing a monograph on sexual violation in Islamic jurispru- dence, a topic she has explored in short publications as well. She has also written a critique of the classical juristic ban on women’s testimony in criminal cases. This article is part of a larger interest in the presentation...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2011) 7 (3): 113–115.
Published: 01 November 2011
... extensive and intensive survey of criminal laws in the Middle East relating to women and sexuality, covering legal dealings with adultery under shari‘a, honor crimes, rape, incest and sexual abuse of children, sexual harassment, homosexuality, transsexual/transvestism, illegitimate...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2009) 5 (1): 80–93.
Published: 01 March 2009
... database (al-Obaidli 2006). Other statistics provided by the Ministry of the Interior show that in 2004, 65 complaints of domestic violence were presented as follows: 23 cases of assault and fi ghting were addressed to the Off ense Court; 5 to the Criminal Court (3 involving homicide and 2 assault...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2018) 14 (3): 384–389.
Published: 01 November 2018
..., Palestinians should oppose abortion as part of steadfast support for the national cause. Criminalization of abortion in Palestine and other violations of women’s health rights are forms of gender-based violence legitimized by society and the Palestinian Authority and reinforced by Israeli colonial aggression...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2010) 6 (1): 117–128.
Published: 01 March 2010
... Global European Union Dina Al-Kassim, University of California, Irvine n February 26, 2008, the Council of the European Union (CEU) Oarrived at a Framework Decision designed to combat particularly serious forms of racism and xenophobia by criminal law (CEU 2008).1 By proposing a...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2017) 13 (1): 154–167.
Published: 01 March 2017
... funding, Chiao contends that ECWR moved toward top-down projects, such as conducting research and promoting draft legal amendments to criminalize sexual harassment in Egypt (ECWR 2009 ; FIDH et al. 2014 , 74). 4 Within Egypt’s militarized and neoliberal environment, ECWR and other NGOs sought to...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2011) 7 (3): 98–112.
Published: 01 November 2011
... or her sect’s personal status codes related to marriage, inheritance, and so forth. Homosexual practices are criminalized in the Penal Code of Leba- non, under the moniker of “unnatural sexual intercourse”1 (Republic of Lebanon 1943, Article 534), specifically sexual intercourse that...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2015) 11 (2): 240–241.
Published: 01 July 2015
... deemed to be “dressed indecently” under Article 152 of the Public Order Act of 1996 and Article 152 of the Criminal Act, instituted by the Islamist government that took power in 1989, led by President Omar al-Bashir. Soon after coming to power, the president highlighted the need for Sudanese woman to be...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2017) 13 (3): 491–493.
Published: 01 November 2017
... criminalization of Mexican labor migrants in the United States as murderous rapists and Mexicans in Mexico as “bad hombres.” In a world deeply structured by transnational flows of people, commodities, and information, all of these gestures are bound to fail in the control of mobility, but they are already...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2016) 12 (2): 268–274.
Published: 01 July 2016
... ( 2003 , 192–93) work, which sheds light on the different ways of arranging, conveying, and disseminating memory: “The archives . . . can contain the grisly record of criminal violence—the documents, photographs, and remains that tell of disappearances. . . . The repertoire . . . holds the tales of the...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2017) 13 (1): 135–137.
Published: 01 March 2017
... something to do with religion, but Islam comes in as a part of a multilayered explanatory framework, which includes the state—its legislation, the economic protection it provides, particularly for unmarried women, criminalization, and its enforcement; the place of NGOs and its relations to the state...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2017) 13 (1): 178–180.
Published: 01 March 2017
... victims and soldiers’ criminal offenses. Nevertheless, even the pro-AKP far-right Islamist newspaper Yeni Akit, infamous for its sexist and violence-prone vulgarity, which covered the alleged beheading with a headline, “The People Chopped Off the Head of the Traitor Coupist,” had to pull back following...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2017) 13 (2): 318–320.
Published: 01 July 2017
... Egypt, though it was not until the 1930s, Gadelrab notes, that prostitution was fully criminalized by the Egyptian state. At times Medicine and Morality in Egypt relies heavily on secondary sources; primary texts would have strengthened Gadelrab’s claims about shifts in medicine that related to...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2006) 2 (1): 138–140.
Published: 01 March 2006
... in society in the years of 1992 and 2001 ironically produced criminal delinquents who imposed violent behavior, even on their own inmates. Furthermore, the prison indirectly produces Sepideh—the child of Revolution whose mother was executed in prison, thus throwing her alone into the lower...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2007) 3 (2): 122–125.
Published: 01 July 2007
... reign, the climate in Morocco was one of pervasive fear, police surveillance, and censorship; throughout this period, all political activity and thought were criminalized (6). Th erefore, one of the main goals of her book is to give the oppressed a voice through her emphasis on performance...