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corpse

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Published: 01 July 2016
Figure 3. Arrows Piercing the Corpse Figure 3. Arrows Piercing the Corpse More
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2018) 14 (1): 109–115.
Published: 01 March 2018
... rack his brains about the enigma of life and death. —Sigmund Freud, “Thoughts for the Times on War and Death” I have understood part of miriam cooke’s work over the years to embody a commitment to understanding the forms of cultural production that emerge in the context of life beside a corpse or...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2016) 12 (2): 268–274.
Published: 01 July 2016
...Figure 3. Arrows Piercing the Corpse Figure 3. Arrows Piercing the Corpse ...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2016) 12 (3): 382–410.
Published: 01 November 2016
... Istanbul’s outskirts (Livaneli 1995 ; Milliyet 1995a , 1995b , 1995c , 1995d , 1995e , 1995f , 1995g , 1995h ). Some journalists stayed with the group at the graveyard for a day and night, keeping their cameras on until the prosecutor finalized its report verifying that the corpse the Ocak family...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2010) 6 (1): 103–116.
Published: 01 March 2010
... subjects’ motives and aspira- tions. A number of photographs in the series feature women gazing into the camera, engaging the viewer with open stares. Here in “Untitled,” most of the subject’s face has been cut out of the frame. Only her mouth is visible. Dry, pale, and corpse-like, the woman’s lips...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2011) 7 (1): 39–69.
Published: 01 March 2011
...” (her corpse) and the task of cleaning up “the mess” (the blood).2 INTRODUCTION Traversing the thorny routes of Mahtab’s life, this paper envisages the conditions that might have driven her to her final resting place.3 It ponders the limits of the laws of...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2018) 14 (2): 152–173.
Published: 01 July 2018
... tomb shared with the bodies of a man and a woman, al-Sarakhsi was more explicit about status: “Put a partition of dirt between each corpse . . . and place the man so that he faces the qibla , then the khuntha behind him, then the woman behind the khuntha, because facing the qibla is more honorable...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2015) 11 (1): 80–97.
Published: 01 March 2015
... drag Amina away from the corpse with “strength and violence … as if from my last hope in life. … They locked me [ habasuni ] in a room, and for the first time I felt that it was possible for people to do without me: my prison [ habsi ] was far from them” (ibid., 15). Here she is trapped in a microcosm...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2016) 12 (3): 343–362.
Published: 01 November 2016
... visits the cemetery the following day the caretaker tells him, “By day, they buried her in a tomb on that side, but at night they came back and opened the grave and took her corpse and buried her there, to take her away from the Jews, they said she was a Muslim, an infidel” (ibid., 95). Even in death, a...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2016) 12 (1): 31–49.
Published: 01 March 2016
... “modern” battle against “octopus” corporations poised to throttle the livelihood and dignity of the average man. ʿAlim reveals the forces that have twisted the lives and aspirations of four young men living in a backwater alley where a young woman’s naked but unidentifiable corpse has been discovered...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2007) 3 (1): 86–105.
Published: 01 March 2007
... food. No more water. No more medicine. They treated people who got wounded with salt. Za‘ater fell. People went down and surrendered themselves in Dikwaneh. From Tell al-Za‘ater to Dikwaneh we were walking on Palestinian corpses thrown on the ground. Umm...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2011) 7 (3): 36–70.
Published: 01 November 2011
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2012) 8 (1): 63–91.
Published: 01 March 2012
... with sand. The women witnessed the corpses of their beloved ones being torn and eaten by wild dogs at night; this terrifying scene became a collective metaphor for the suffering during Anfal. The women’s self-concepts as caring mothers, wives, and daughters were deeply shattered. Among the...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2017) 13 (2): 195–218.
Published: 01 July 2017
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2010) 6 (1): 1–45.
Published: 01 March 2010
..., “We have seen corpses fi lling the streets of the camp.” “Yes, we saw the bodies. Th ey were many. We know some of them.” “I saw As’ad’s leg. Th ey took it to the hospital.” She describes a silent woman sitting on a pile of rubble, guarding what was left of her former house. She describes...