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consumption

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Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2009) 5 (3): 11–35.
Published: 01 November 2009
... despair and exclusions of the second, transformed political engagement from a positive into a largely negative qualification. The material side of marriage has again become more important, public displays of consumption acceptable, and celebrations more expensive. These shift s are shaped by the effects...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2010) 6 (3): 58–90.
Published: 01 November 2010
...Reina Lewis Recently developed to serve the consumption needs of an emergent Islamic bourgeoisie, English-language Muslim lifestyle media depart from previous community media by including fashion as an integral part of the genre. Creating fashion editorial brings lifestyle publications up against...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2010) 6 (3): 91–117.
Published: 01 November 2010
... Indonesia’s rising Islamic fashion industry and lifestyle media have placed women at the center of broader cultural debates about the relationship between devotion and consumption. Carla Jones is Assistant Professor of Anthropology at the University of Colorado, Boulder. Her research situates questions...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2015) 11 (2): 256–257.
Published: 01 July 2015
...Lila Sharif Copyright © 2015 by the Association for Middle East Women’s Studies 2015 As Palestinians continue to experience the violent decimation of their olive groves, the consumption of Palestinian olive oil grows increasingly popular through transnational fair trade circuits. A...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2016) 12 (1): 99–101.
Published: 01 March 2016
... a particular national identity through defining Moroccan fashion for global consumption. Jansen’s manuscript draws from in-depth interviews with Moroccan fashion designers and observation fieldwork that complements her scholarly readings of Moroccan historians, anthropologists of dress, and...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2010) 6 (3): 1–18.
Published: 01 November 2010
... 1 2  JOURNAL OF MIDDLE EAST WOMEN’S STUDIES 6:3 through commodities and consumption practices (Abu-Lughod 1995; 2005; Öncü 1995; Saktanber 1997; 2002; Bilici 1999; Göle 1999; 2002; Fealy and White 2008; Fischer 2008; Pink 2009). Muslims identify as such and connect with one...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2006) 2 (2): 149–152.
Published: 01 July 2006
... modernity. Nancy Young Reynolds’ unpublished thesis on consumption from 1910 until 1960 suggests how significant a role consumption played in nationalist articulations with the issue of the boycott of foreign goods and the dumping of local products, by focusing on the history of depart- ment stores in...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2018) 14 (1): 92–93.
Published: 01 March 2018
... piece by İz Öztat depicts water as the flowing and irrepressible context for the nourishment of life. Water is also an archive of unsustainable consumption, dense pooling, death, blockages, and barriers. Like several pieces in this issue, Öztat’s watercolor emerges from a storytelling project that asks...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2010) 6 (3): 200–202.
Published: 01 November 2010
.... Carla Jones is Assistant Professor of Anthropology at the University of Colorado, Boulder. Her research situates questions of class and gender in the context of urban Indonesia. She has written on consumption, Is- lam, mass media, and globalization, and was co-editor with Ann Marie Leshkowich and...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2019) 15 (1): 101–103.
Published: 01 March 2019
... concepts of “home,” drove key material and discursive elements that produced change in Beirut and constructed a new middle class. European influence and investment, urban reforms and expansion, and consumption of goods came to define the modern “home.” Indeed, class is a principal category of analysis in...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2006) 2 (2): 146–149.
Published: 01 July 2006
...’ unpublished thesis on consumption from 1910 until 1960 suggests how significant a role consumption played in nationalist articulations with the issue of the boycott of foreign goods and the dumping of local products, by focusing on the history of depart- ment stores in Cairo, which she studied from the...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2008) 4 (3): 119–120.
Published: 01 November 2008
... from the U.S., Canada, Kuwait, Jordan, Japan, and England [to] examine the cultural, political, and eco- nomic forces that manufacture Muslim women’s images for consumption and how women both produce and consume these images.” Organized by cooke and Ellen McLarney at Duke, Banu Gökarıksel at the...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2017) 13 (2): 321–323.
Published: 01 July 2017
... marker of Muslim (feminine) identity, the scarf, or by extension the veiled body, interact with practices that are deemed secular and modern, such as fashion? This richly documented and remarkably insightful book provides a set of answers by looking at the production, marketing, consumption, and cultural...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2017) 13 (3): 489–490.
Published: 01 November 2017
... feminist in order to be let into the United States? It occurred to me that identifying as a feminist was probably not a good idea. What kind of credential would be needed to show that one is a “good Muslim,” or no Muslim at all, despite the family name? Should I refer to alcohol consumption, my views on...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2018) 14 (3): 354–355.
Published: 01 November 2018
.... They entered the masculine space of publishing by participating in the women’s press and by issuing poetry and autobiographies. Yousef examines two technologies that impacted literacy and consumption: the postal service and the telegraph. While these two institutions in Egypt have been examined...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2019) 15 (1): 104–106.
Published: 01 March 2019
... modernizing them according to American standards. These new commodities created new desires and practices, indicating that Iranians neither passively mimicked nor uniformly embraced the consumption practices of Western counterparts. Karimi’s project offers a crucial intervention in showing how, in their...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2010) 6 (3): 19–57.
Published: 01 November 2010
... to public consumption; they would recognize the markers of bourgeois modernity inscribed in each advertisement. Marx provides a simple but useful definition of commodities: “A commodity is, in the first place, an object outside us, a thing that by its properties satisfies human...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2005) 1 (3): 139–144.
Published: 01 November 2005
... in the economy of consumption. Many Palestin- ians use imitation and competition, through buying material goods and using them “properly,” to make claims about the relative modernity of themselves and others, thereby attempting to raise themselves on an economic hierarchy...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2017) 13 (3): 442–444.
Published: 01 November 2017
... element in the complexity of local production. As a given US product “detaches from the source culture from which it comes . . . its national origin is left behind as a trace, and as fragment it is propelled into the world” (12–13). Global consumption then becomes more important than US production: “As...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2012) 8 (2): 105–107.
Published: 01 July 2012
..., nasyid, which Rasmussen critiques as symptomic of the corruptive forces of mass media. The consumption of global media could alternatively be viewed as a strategic identity deployed by Muslim youth in everyday life to negotiate the post-Suharto regime shifts that are accounted for throughout...