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concealment

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Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2015) 11 (2): 139–160.
Published: 01 July 2015
... analysis, I closely examine the borderline space between the ideals of beautification and concealment and how women construct their fashionable veiling in it. By reading the women’s deployment of these ideals against their juristic connotations, I underscore the significance of the veiled Muslim femininity...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2015) 11 (3): 349.
Published: 01 November 2015
... (Iraqi) or mashrabiya . These wooden perforated screens are used in homes as an architectural element to conceal the private from the public. The JMEWS 11:3 cover image by Hayv Kahraman ( Detail Decagram 2 ) evokes a refusal to be objectified but also the layers that block possibilities for...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2007) 3 (3): 75–98.
Published: 01 November 2007
... meaning of female hair and exam- ines the dynamics of revealing and concealing hair in Iran. The image of Iranian women has been politicized through the conventions of unveil- ing and re-veiling. Political regimes have been instrumental in assigning meanings to female hair and the veil...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2007) 3 (1): 128–130.
Published: 01 March 2007
... WOMEN’S STUDIES openly and without any sense of shame, lying about her professional identity (132), concealing her small video camera (109), or taking pictures when people only reluctantly agreed (108). Occasionally I found her writ- ing self-indulgent and bordering on the indiscreet...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2018) 14 (1): 75–77.
Published: 01 March 2018
...] conceals nothing and talks about himself as if he were talking about a character in one of his novels . . . [and who is] capable of speaking about himself from a distance as if he ‘himself’ were independent from the speaking ‘I,’” al-Daif (or shall I say the “real-fictionalized” narrator, Rashid?) adds: I...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2017) 13 (3): 486–488.
Published: 01 November 2017
... is not alien to American politics, what is new, perhaps, is the unabashed promotion of it as a daily means of governance by elected government leaders. It is so brazen as to defy belief. Yet it is a form of governance—a form of governance that conceals or makes acceptable arbitrary, exploitative, and...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2018) 14 (3): 348–350.
Published: 01 November 2018
... archive, Kam exposes the law by granting the public a right to access and know Israel’s archive of executions. Azoulay coins the phrase material archives to account for the ethical dissonance of an archon who is dismantled from within by the compulsion to share widely rather than conceal the source...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2018) 14 (1): 68–74.
Published: 01 March 2018
... about the homosexuality of Joachim? Why did he make it a point to mention the sexuality of his German interlocutor? This seemingly trivial piece of information is for Rashid a concealed invitation to scrutinize Joachim’s sexuality and ask the unthinkable: Is Joachim a real man? How can his...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2008) 4 (1): 135–138.
Published: 01 March 2008
... MIDDLE EAST WOMEN’S STUDIES of trouble and break down barriers between home and diaspora, public and private, prison and occupation, respectability and disgrace, family and community, or, alternatively, safely reveal what has been concealed, or shore up a potential breach among...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2015) 11 (1): 117–123.
Published: 01 March 2015
... perhaps a connection with it. I then started researching residential structures in the Arab region, which are engineered to segregate the sexes and conceal the private from the public. These houses are also broken into successive hierarchal sections that herald increasing degrees of semiprivate and...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2016) 12 (2): 268–274.
Published: 01 July 2016
... internally in a courtyard. Its main social function is to conceal or create a visual boundary between the private domain and the public, including ensuring segregation of the sexes. 4. Black clothing that covers the entire body. 5. Yazid sent his troops to Karbala, Iraq, to eliminate Imam Husayn...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2016) 12 (1): 68–87.
Published: 01 March 2016
... belief or (what would amount to a different but also burdensome thing) to conceal it. Both brothers carry on in the subjunctive modality of “as if”— as if Newzad were a believing Muslim, illuminating a central truth of the fictional dimension of human relatedness. We can also see how desire in a...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2018) 14 (3): 268–291.
Published: 01 November 2018
... claiming of our mother as an “Arabian” wife concealed the shards of empire embedded deep in our domestic viscera. Our world in Beirut, strange as it was, was as naturalized and taken for granted as Fadia’s was, growing up Aramcon in Saudi Arabia, strange as that was. Children make worlds their own...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2012) 8 (3): 143–154.
Published: 01 November 2012
... resemblance to online dating. This is particularly prevalent on the Israeli side. Whereas many Iranians only display a text message or appear with concealed faces in fear of censorship and persecution, the Israeli posters repeatedly, almost obsessively display moments of their everyday...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2016) 12 (3): 306–322.
Published: 01 November 2016
... Kurdish sisters elsewhere, while simultaneously painting Kurdish women as exceptional in a region where women are subject to patriarchal interpretations of Islam. Dirik’s nationalism further conceals important socioeconomic differences in the four parts of Kurdistan. Women from poor families are more...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2016) 12 (3): 323–342.
Published: 01 November 2016
... with women who were sexually assaulted in protest spaces, O. and L., they described cases of sexual violence against men that they witnessed firsthand. O. noted that when the assailants began to assault her, they thought she was a man, as she was wearing attire that concealed her identity. A young man...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2015) 11 (1): 80–97.
Published: 01 March 2015
... discrimination during colonial times. The two works share a third commonality: both conceal a sharp critique in a surface narrative. This article extends critical analysis of Dreams of Trespass to Tomorrow We’ll Get Our Land Back , which shares with Dreams the trope of Moroccan women imprisoned by...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2009) 5 (1): 1–23.
Published: 01 March 2009
... largely the result of Cold War tensions in the region.2 Th e “mask” of the unveiled face replaces this history with a narrative of a triumphant and victorious U.S. nationalism. Such media images conceal or displace the humanity of the face and the raw truth of its history and its real vul...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2010) 6 (1): 103–116.
Published: 01 March 2010
...- ancevic 2008). Working almost exclusively in black and white, Neshat stages a visual dialogue between violence and silence, concealment and exposure, the particular and the universal—the very dialogues Far- rokhzad staged in her poems and fi lms in the 1950s and 1960s. Th e...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2007) 3 (2): 56–85.
Published: 01 July 2007
... reproduction and a disjuncture in his lineage. In other words, the rites meant to connect the present with the past and the future conceal the lack of connection that the sterile present, disfi gured by the military occupation, has with what has preceded it and what is to fol- low. Moreover...