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compulsory veiling

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Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2021) 17 (2): 220–239.
Published: 01 July 2021
...Claudia Yaghoobi Abstract While text-based and cyberspace campaigns against compulsory veiling in Iran have received much attention, Iranian diasporic creative writers have also engaged in this resistance through their writings, but they have remained almost unacknowledged. This article argues...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2007) 3 (3): 75–98.
Published: 01 November 2007
... 1995, 107). Compulsory unveiling led to the social isolation of women who refused to unveil. Among those who did not support unveiling were some who favored women’s education, but since girls were not allowed to attend school wearing the veil, these women refused to send...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2014) 10 (3): 87–108.
Published: 01 November 2014
...—that is, undisciplined bodies can still be mobilized to effectively demonstrate the necessity of the disciplining power (Foucault 1980, 195 – 6). In this case, the Iranian state uses the “unhealthy” bodies of Iranian women—allegedly the result of compulsory veiling—to justify the “need...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2009) 5 (2): 1–22.
Published: 01 July 2009
... in the public sphere. Many women resisted these views, staged protests against compulsory veiling, continued to participate in the labor force (especially in the 1980s when they were needed due to the labor shortages and weaken- ing wartime economy), and enrolled in universities when possible...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2017) 13 (3): 416–437.
Published: 01 November 2017
... that links music, female singing, and veiling with issues of morality and political expression. In the early 1980s the revolutionary government enforced compulsory veiling, strict limits on music making, and a ban on public female singing as part of its larger efforts to eradicate “corruption...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2020) 16 (2): 124–143.
Published: 01 July 2020
... theme of male violence and women’s domestic problems, questioning shariʿa laws as they are applied to women. Women without Men , published a decade after the Revolution, portrays the struggle of women for equality and freedom after compulsory veiling and gender segregation. In the early 1980s women...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2016) 12 (2): 288–290.
Published: 01 July 2016
... are dissidents renegotiating their sexualities and redrawing the boundaries of what may be possible in a culture of compulsory virginity. The third space is a way to reinscribe sexual behavior and build solidarity in the spaces reserved for men where opposite sex partner relationships are not available. However...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2020) 16 (2): 235–243.
Published: 01 July 2020
... that said, “No, the veil is not compulsory.” Everyone was euphoric. At the same time, there was a pullback by many women, because they thought they had won, and many didn’t come to the march scheduled the next day, on March 12, because they thought the issue was settled, but the issue wasn’t settled...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2008) 4 (1): 83–106.
Published: 01 March 2008
... the defeat of women’s suff rage and the publication of Nazira Zayn al-Din’s explosive treatise, Unveiling and Veiling (19281928). IInn tthehe eearlyarly 1920s, many women had entertained hopes that their wartime service would be rewarded with full citizenship rights. Syrian writers Nazik...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2014) 10 (2): 52–79.
Published: 01 July 2014
... of Education; the religious curriculum offered at every level has been shaped by conservative, reformist, Sunni Islam with the purpose of building a “purer” Islamic society (Schwedler 2002, 50). Islah’s control over education has resulted in sex segregated schools, compulsory veiling...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2020) 16 (1): 1–18.
Published: 01 March 2020
... that focuses on the perceived oppression of Islam to one that highlights the violence of the secular state. Copyright © 2020 by the Association for Middle East Women’s Studies 2020 Faiza Ambah veiling secularism feminism Muslim women My hair is neither sacred nor cheap, Neither the cause...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2013) 9 (3): 108–135.
Published: 01 November 2013
... is forbidden to men, and the campus is surrounded by walls and strictly separated from the outside; students are not allowed to go out before a specific hour unless a mahram (close male relative) picks them up. Moreover, rules define in detail, among other elements, compulsory dress...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2008) 4 (3): 89–118.
Published: 01 November 2008
... and the public spheres. In the past two decades, gradual transgressions of urf and sharia have become a sign of modernity and resistance for many women and young people who wish to generate changes in their situation. Since 2001, the trend of willfully neglected veiling (bad-hejabi) in physical space has been...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2020) 16 (3): 307–325.
Published: 01 November 2020
... fully veiled, with men on the other side of the street (Sedghi 2007 : 25). Upper-middle-class women were categorically shielded from the outside world and not allowed under any circumstances to take on paid work. Their voice was “considered part of [their] ʿ Owrat [pudenda] and subject to strict...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2016) 12 (2): 143–165.
Published: 01 July 2016
...- mahrems of opposite sexes are expected to establish distance and follow codes of invisible boundaries, such as segregation, veiling, a limited gaze, and controlled behavior. By delineating basic principles of marriage, mahremiyet creates heterosexual barriers and regulates proximity and gendered...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2008) 4 (3): 58–88.
Published: 01 November 2008
... with the Baha’i Tarbiyat school) by Tuba Rushdiyah, princi- 70  JOURNAL OF MIDDLE EAST WOMEN’S STUDIES 4:3 pal of Parvarish (Rushdiyah 1983; Vaziri 1996).16 Women of the Rushdi- yah family went on to found more girls’ schools in Tehran: Hijab (Veil) and Khayrat al-Hisan (Virtuous Charity...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2021) 17 (1): 64–95.
Published: 01 March 2021
... ; Chelkowski 2005 ; Fischer 1980 ). In the allegorical landscape of revolution, so proposes this analytic, women in the streets were the “veiled sisters” to the “warrior brotherhood” of the masculinist revolutionary movement. I would certainly agree that the character of Zainab became a political symbol...
FIGURES | View All (13)
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2012) 8 (2): 78–101.
Published: 01 July 2012
... research, Arlene Elowe MacLeod (1991) examines the impact of veiled women’s employment in Cairo, Egypt on household relations, suggesting that more veiled women are seeking employment. She argues that veiling is “found to be not reactionary behavior” but a “political struggle to fight...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2008) 4 (1): 6–30.
Published: 01 March 2008
... Party. But how was the cultural landscape transformed between 1936 and 1943? Briefl y, the Women’s Awakening project demanded that all Iranian women remove their veils in public. In exchange, women were given greater access to education and state employment. Women’s Awak...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2007) 3 (2): 86–109.
Published: 01 July 2007
... to in- corporate other important factors, particularly those related to national and international political economy. Th is failure is partly responsible for the fact that, by and large, the literature focuses on family law, women’s legal status, the women’s movement, and the veil. Such topics...