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belly

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Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2009) 5 (2): 85–88.
Published: 01 July 2009
...Nada Elia Imagining Arab Womanhood: The Cultural Mythology of Veils, Harems, and Belly Dancers in the U.S. , Jarmakani Amira . New York : Palgrave Macmillan , 2008 . Pp. xiii, 236 . ISBN 987-0-230-60472-8 . Copyright © 2009 Association for Middle East Women’s Studies 2009...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2010) 6 (2): 86–114.
Published: 01 July 2010
...John Tofik Karam This article asks how Syrian-Lebanese men and non-Middle Eastern Brazilian women have enacted their relationship to belly dancingin São Paulo. While men and women of Arab origins have usually framed the dance as an essential link to their ethnic heritage, non-Arab female...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2018) 14 (3): 374–378.
Published: 01 November 2018
... about dreams, thoughts, and feminine cycles. One picture of a woman having a C-section read, “I didn’t feel my belly,” while another showed a breastfeeding woman with the text “As if my breasts were his/hers, I felt under invasion.” The book cover photo shows a breastfeeding woman holding up her middle...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2018) 14 (1): 86–88.
Published: 01 March 2018
... recognizes this artistic movement in this region, thereby addressing a long-standing gap in dance studies and performance studies, whose focus is frequently state folk-dance ensembles or the solo performance genre of raks sharqi (“oriental dance,” also known as “belly dance”) in the context of women’s...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2009) 5 (2): 83–85.
Published: 01 July 2009
.... Imagining Arab Womanhood: Th e Cultural Mythology of Veils, Harems, and Belly Dancers in the U.S. Amira Jarmakani. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2008. Pp. xiii, 236. ISBN 987-0-230-60472-8. Reviewed by Nada Elia, Antioch University Seattle...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2015) 11 (1): 63–79.
Published: 01 March 2015
... the Middle East is Karin van Nieuwkerk’s study of the historically and culturally changing reputations, lives, and livelihoods of belly dancers in twentieth-century Egypt. “The crux of the gender issue,” van Nieuwkerk ( 1995 , 183, 184) argues, “is that women are generally viewed as sexual beings...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2010) 6 (3): 183–187.
Published: 01 November 2010
..., eyelashes, kohl, seductive look and all. Her head was covered with a silk Islamic veil, and her upper belly was exposed above tight American jeans. She is another type of Muslim women; she obeys her god by wearing the veil and shops in the free market for whatever she likes, free choice...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2017) 13 (1): 128–131.
Published: 01 March 2017
... eroticism, Yasmina Brunet’s paper “La danse orientale comme traduction de l’érotisme arabe aujourd’hui, limites et enjeux” was notable for treating a performance art and for dealing with creative works largely produced in the Arab diaspora. Brunet provided a categorization of trends in contemporary belly...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2016) 12 (2): 275–283.
Published: 01 July 2016
... that they’d try to portray a Middle Eastern Barbie either as a belly dancer or a concubine” (Associated Press 2015 ). Razanne explicitly stands as an alternative to the supposed Western stereotyping of Muslims (or at least the stereotypes of the exotic and implicitly erotic Middle East Barbie...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2011) 7 (1): 1–38.
Published: 01 March 2011
... family meal, the girl would receive an additional meal that usually included rich foods such as couscous, flour mixed with yeast that would ferment and inflate her belly, millet porridge (known as qseb), lamb fat, meat patties, and a glass of olive oil or fish oil, sometimes mixed with egg yolks...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2016) 12 (2): 166–180.
Published: 01 July 2016
... moments of transgressions, when people block a small street for nights of dancing and in many cases enjoy the spectacle of scantily clad belly dancers and consume hashish. Nevertheless, for the geography of intimacies, coffee shops remain symbolic of fun. They earn this reputation due to their open and...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2017) 13 (1): 71–86.
Published: 01 March 2017
... be killed. When bidding her mother farewell before boarding the train to Cairo, “Hamida put the black veil onto her head—it covered her neck, her shoulders, her chest, her belly and her back. She looked just like one of the women in her village” (22). When the “family honor” is soiled, Hamidu’s...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2007) 3 (3): 21–44.
Published: 01 November 2007
... years Nahmani [male form] was carrying a tiny embryo in a lucid glasslike belly, floating in a min- iature icy lake of liquid nitrogen at Assuta Medical Center. Now that he has had enough of this prolonged pregnancy, which indeed does not entail any morning sickness or duck-walk...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2012) 8 (2): 26–50.
Published: 01 July 2012
... “youth,” we repeat, is the outwork- ing of a specific set of social conditions; its evolution, still ongoing, bespeaks a submerged history of modernity and its imperial under- belly. (Comaroff and Comaroff 2005, )22 The girl, especially the African or Muslim girl...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2013) 9 (1): 81–109.
Published: 01 March 2013
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2018) 14 (2): 174–192.
Published: 01 July 2018
... others like him to embody poor and working-class tough-guy masculinity ( lat ). The Pahlavi monarchy worried about the cultivation of future male citizens by the lat who frequented the zurkhaneh . They represented the “authentic” Iranian male: large framed and sporting a round belly and thick mustache...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2018) 14 (2): 193–212.
Published: 01 July 2018
... assumed for men in passive/receptive positions in intercourse, nor is the term luti used to refer to him. 3 Throughout the novel khawala , a term originating at the turn of the twentieth century in Egypt to refer to young men who belly dance and engage in sexual relations with male clients, is...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2016) 12 (2): 181–202.
Published: 01 July 2016
... midthirties, respectively, and who do not cover their hair or dress modestly. Sibel’s twenty-one-year-old daughter helps in the salon, applying makeup, performing depilation, and, until her recent marriage, offering private classes in oryantal , the Turkish belly dance. Several times a week two middle-aged...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2017) 13 (1): 25–46.
Published: 01 March 2017
... his hips like a belly dancer.” By indicating that rivals are “assmongers” ( götoğlanı ) who “offer/sell their asses” fans use emasculating language to differentiate themselves from other clubs’ fans. They claim an ideal image of masculinity while simultaneously depriving their rivals of this standard...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2014) 10 (1): 53–81.
Published: 01 March 2014
... privileged, I am constantly in the belly of the beast, biting, inside, you know, just nibbling away and sometimes taking big bites.” Ever cognizant of the potential threat to academic freedom, Hale continues to hold universities and scholars to their liberal values, in- cluding...