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aspirational maternalism

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Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2018) 14 (1): 45–67.
Published: 01 March 2018
... single mothers to imagine alternative maternal futures. I argue that by invoking a counternarrative I call “aspirational maternalism,” single-mother advocates disrupt traditional maternalist rhetoric that excludes single women. Aspirational maternalism draws on moral discourses and neoliberal values of...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2016) 12 (3): 363–381.
Published: 01 November 2016
...’ mothers in Israeli public life changed since the 1982 Lebanon War? At the center of the discussion is David Grossman’s novel To the End of the Land (2008). I argue that the author posits “the flight from bad tidings” as both a maternal strategy and the author’s psychopoetic strategy. This article examines...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2017) 13 (3): 395–415.
Published: 01 November 2017
... a messianic femininity that emphasizes maternal duties and women’s redemptive power in Judaism while challenging male religious authorities and religious law in other areas. Activists define themselves as guardians of domestic space and the House of God (the future Third Temple) and redeemers of the...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2008) 4 (1): 132–135.
Published: 01 March 2008
... dynamics as they pertain to education and educational aspirations, a heavy emphasis on education long having been a key element of Palestinian national identity. She re- ports that 87 percent of parents surveyed wish for their sons to achieve a bachelor’s degree or higher, and 72 percent for their...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2007) 3 (3): 21–44.
Published: 01 November 2007
... effort and was explicitly praised as such (Shuval 1992, 66). The demographic interest was soon translated into an official pro- DAPHNA BIRENBAUM-CARMELI  25 natalist policy.5 Shortly after the state of Israel was founded, it began to distribute maternity...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2008) 4 (1): 6–30.
Published: 01 March 2008
..., consistent with their maternal role.”2 Soon thereaft er, the Women’s Party joined the Women’s Committee of the communist Tudeh Party in a joint statement calling for women’s suff rage, which they addressed to the Prime Minister’s offi ce and “newspapers of the capital.” In 1944, a Tudeh...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2016) 12 (1): 50–67.
Published: 01 March 2016
... the man she loves symbolizes the discontent of a generation of Syrians who did not act on their aspirations. The miniseries not only shows the power of the dictator to grant dignity and freedom to the country’s citizens but is also a blueprint for a society that can engage in discourse and find common...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2011) 7 (2): 1–26.
Published: 01 July 2011
... spent at her father’s village. At the age of sev- en, ‘A’isha’s education became an arena of struggle between her father’s determination to devote her life to religious education and her desire, supported by her mother and maternal grandfather, to join other girls of her social class...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2014) 10 (1): 82–104.
Published: 01 March 2014
... in relation to women. One central element in this literature focuses on the nation and the constitution of Arab womanhood as maternal and authentic and of women as guardians of honor and tradition (Afkhami and Friedl 1997, Badran 1995, Baron 2005, Hale 1996, Lazreg 1994). In this vein, others...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2010) 6 (3): 118–148.
Published: 01 November 2010
... been called a new Islamic bourgeoisie, an aspiring middle class with tastes and distinctions far removed from the secular, Western-oriented lifestyles of the dominant Turkish elite (Göle 1999; White 1999; 2002; Navaro-Yashin 2002; Saktanber 2002; Göle and Ammann 2006). In this context, a...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2005) 1 (2): 1–24.
Published: 01 July 2005
... Prophet Muhammad, as the complete example of womanhood.” In fulfilling her maternal duties and upholding her religion, Nuriyani asserted, Fatima performed her obligations with steadfastness and decorum, all the while guarding her chastity (1945:1-2). Nuriyani, the editor of a newly founded Per...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2015) 11 (1): 80–97.
Published: 01 March 2015
... same objective as Scheherazade: to empower women to hold and to fight for the same rights as men.” In the narrative Mernissi also tells the stories of many of the women in her city and her maternal grandmother’s country harem. For Turhan-Swenson ( 2007 , 116), Muslim women’s autobiographies “frequently...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2019) 15 (1): 48–74.
Published: 01 March 2019
...-Husri ( 1985a : 27–29) declares that preserving the nation’s glory is directed by maternal love. This portrayal of national love reflects the patriarchization of the man-woman relationship that is based on subordination and coercion. According to al-Husri ( 1951 : 238–39), it is this nationalistic and...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2006) 2 (2): 8–34.
Published: 01 July 2006
... development of Arab-Islamic society that draw from the same conceptual reservoir as many Islamists. Siyadi reveals a distinct prioritization of issues of Arab- Islamic identity and women’s maternal role over other issues that bear on women’s status, such as education. Siyadi recounts how in the...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2005) 1 (1): 110–146.
Published: 01 March 2005
..., governments instituted social security pro- grams for workers in the public sector and for large private sector enterprises. Protective legislation for working mothers—such as paid maternity leave and workplace nurseries—was in place in most MENA countries (ILO 1985; Moghadam 1998; CREDIF...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2008) 4 (1): 83–106.
Published: 01 March 2008
... CHARLOTTE WEBER  87 by the course of events in other countries—the emergence of maternal- ist ideologies in Egypt, India, and parts of Europe, for example, as well as the defeat of women’s suff rage in France. Th ere were also domestic political considerations at work. Th e 1930s saw the rise of...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2018) 14 (1): 3–24.
Published: 01 March 2018
... individual autonomy and self-expression to be natural and universal and oppression, similarly, an obvious fact. This view neglects that aspirations for liberation are produced by specific historical formations and therefore are in principle malleable (Mahmood 2001 , 206–8). Oppression, too, must first be...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2006) 2 (1): 65–94.
Published: 01 March 2006
... emergence of new opportunities and aspirations in the choice of marriage partners; changes in the marriage and divorce laws, giving women new rights; a considerable increase in the rate of divorce; and finally the inclusion and participation of women in the labour market. The extent of the change...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2010) 6 (2): 86–114.
Published: 01 July 2010
... that it enabled daughters to honor their mothers and “all the mothers of the world.” In contrast to this international aspiration, a signifi cant number of the performers used stage names of Middle Eastern origin such as Amira, Layla, or Najua. Intrigued, I asked a male colleague about the...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2008) 4 (2): 1–28.
Published: 01 July 2008
... HTCs generally do not provide adequate diagnostic and treatment services for infertility. Th eir major goal is to serve married women, aged 15–49, who are eligible for family planning, or mothers with children under the age of two who require maternal and child healthcare...