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Saddam Hussein

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Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2015) 11 (2): 161–178.
Published: 01 July 2015
... of anticipation is crushed by a Symbolic world that comes to be dominated by Saddam Hussein and the traumatic eruptions of the Real. The article suggests that by introducing the figure of the mother as le grand autre , Salbi’s autobiography subverts the typical conceptualization of the Lacanian...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2016) 12 (3): 433–449.
Published: 01 November 2016
...Achim Rohde Copyright © 2016 by the Association for Middle East Women’s Studies 2016 Much has been written about gender-based violence against Iraqi women under the thirty-five-year dictatorship of Saddam Hussein and since the fall of the regime in 2003 (Brown and Romano 2006 , 56, 60–62...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2007) 3 (1): 128–130.
Published: 01 March 2007
... seven years of the most comprehensive sanctions regime ever inflicted on a country, in addition to the ongoing political repression by the regime of Saddam Hussein. After her initial trip, Ditmars traveled to Iraq on numerous occasions, writing for the New York Times, the Inde- pendent...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2005) 1 (3): 147–151.
Published: 01 November 2005
... Iraq, where she spent three months, and returned to Iran and Turkey for two months on a second trip. Th e plight of Kurdish minorities in these four countries was overlooked for years and only recently has begun to receive attention in the United States as information about Saddam Hussein’s...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2016) 12 (1): 96–98.
Published: 01 March 2016
... characters living in Saddam Hussein’s Iraq. The face of the narrator, Dalal, has been scarred, and Ilham has breast cancer. The main character of Bitar’s Imraʾa min Hadha al-ʿAsr (2010) is a twice-divorced cancer patient named Maryam. In stark contrast to the silence and marginality of disabled women in...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2009) 5 (2): 101–104.
Published: 01 July 2009
... conservative as the regime promoted state-sponsored Islam and neo-tribalism. It would be useful to have details of what, for example, Saddam Hussein and the General Federation of Iraqi Women were saying about the role of Iraqi women during this time. Were their discourses merely refl ecting shift s in...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2005) 1 (3): 144–147.
Published: 01 November 2005
... information about Saddam Hussein’s brutal treatment of them continues to emerge. We are now familiar with stories of the suppression of Kurds in Iraq, but Kurdish groups have also been the subject of state violence and repression in Syria, Turkey, and Iran. In Syria, aft er independence in 1946...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2007) 3 (3): 105–108.
Published: 01 November 2007
... relating to “peace” remained focused on the brutality of Saddam Hussein’s regime and how the Kurdish nation fought against it. This nationalistic thrust running throughout the entire conference obscured the negative impact of the current war, occupation, and mili- tarization of Iraq on...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2012) 8 (1): 63–91.
Published: 01 March 2012
... assistance from the Kurdish political leadership added to the suffering of the Anfal women. Saddam Hussein was still in power; the catastrophe could be repeated. The Kurdish political parties focused on the political fight for autonomy and engaged in a violent internal conflict between...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2016) 12 (2): 268–274.
Published: 01 July 2016
... invasion and occupation of Iraq, and it was the first time ʿAshura was publicly celebrated because it had been banned during Saddam Hussein’s regime for over thirty years. In the face of random violence and repression, I became preoccupied with the concept of trauma and bereavement, memory and witnessing...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2012) 8 (1): 1–9.
Published: 01 March 2012
... atrocities of human rights violations under Saddam Hussein of Iraq and Hassan II of Morocco, respectively. Both pay close attention to recently launched communal reparation projects in the respective countries. Notwithstanding the strong differences be- tween the political histories of Morocco and...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2018) 14 (2): 174–192.
Published: 01 July 2018
... institutionalized the recruitment of underage boys by giving income to the families of boy soldiers, pensions to families at a son’s death, and compensation to recruitment officers. In November 1980, around two months after Saddam Hussein invaded Khuzistan, a headline announced the evacuation of women and...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2011) 7 (3): 98–112.
Published: 01 November 2011
...- ably too positive, comparing the “fresh” and “joyful” aforementioned demonstration (the actual title of the article was “Rainbow Flag,” printed in English) to the “grumpy” demonstration held by establishment parties marching behind huge pictures of Saddam Hussein, Bashar Al-Asad, and other...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2009) 5 (2): 90–93.
Published: 01 July 2009
... Introduction herself, in which she provides historical background for the literary tradition in Iraq leading up to the BOOK REVIEWS  91 post-Saddam present, and situates both her female authorial self and the novel within this tradition. Th e book...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2013) 9 (1): 30–53.
Published: 01 March 2013
... of Iraqi President Saddam Hussein’s chemical weapons attacks during the First Gulf War. From the outset, the unexpected news causes panic among residents who find themselves in a catch-22: They must abide by the curfew while at the 44  mn  Journal of Middle East women’s studies  9:1...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2005) 1 (1): 53–78.
Published: 01 March 2005
... deserved it ar- gues that police harassment should not be seen as a larger pattern in society: You know you don’t blame the American society for that. You have a drunk come in sometimes and calls you names just because they are fighting Saddam Hussein or whatever. You don’t have nothing to...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2010) 6 (2): 31–58.
Published: 01 July 2010
... found in Bahrain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emir- ates (they are also found in Lebanon, India, Pakistan, and elsewhere). In all of these Gulf countries (except Iran and the Shi‘i community in post-Saddam Iraq), the Shi‘a have a marginalized...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2007) 3 (1): 58–85.
Published: 01 March 2007
... US launched its war against Baghdad in order to “liberate” Kuwait, Kurdish political parties hoped that the war might lead to the fall of Saddam Hussein or even the creation of an independent Kurdish state. However, Western powers and the UN recognized the sovereignty of the Iraqi...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2006) 2 (1): 1–32.
Published: 01 March 2006
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2009) 5 (2): 23–52.
Published: 01 July 2009
...” countries. One man living in Kuwait with his two brothers was brutally beaten (including in the genitals) by a gang of angry Kuwaitis who scapegoated the Palestinians during the fi rst Gulf War (when the PLO sided with Saddam Hussein against the U.S.–led coalition). Another young man, who was sent by...