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Kurdish women in Turkey

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Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2018) 14 (1): 3–24.
Published: 01 March 2018
...Marlene Schäfers Abstract Women’s rights and human rights projects in Turkey and elsewhere routinely construe and celebrate subaltern voice as an index of individual and collective empowerment. Through an ethnographic study of Kurdish women singers’ ( dengbêj s) efforts to engage in their...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2017) 13 (1): 47–68.
Published: 01 March 2017
... in Istanbul whose sons were deployed to the conflict zone and returned home without any injuries, this article examines how the conflict has impacted the mothers’ perception of national service, of the Kurdish conflict, and of the “East.” I argue that the women start to partly question the obligation...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2015) 11 (1): 114–116.
Published: 01 March 2015
...Esin Düzel Kurdish Life in Contemporary Turkey: Migration, Gender, and Ethnic Identity Grabolle-Çeliker Anna London : Tauris , 2013 299 pages. isbn 978-1-78076-092-6 Copyright © 2015 by the Association for Middle East Women’s Studies 2015 Anna Grabolle-Çeliker’s Kurdish Life in...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2017) 13 (3): 354–375.
Published: 01 November 2017
... (Bozarslan 2001 ; Tezcur 2013 ). During this period many Kurdish women’s rights activists were imprisoned and tortured alongside Kurdish men in Turkey’s notorious prisons, particularly Diyarbakır Prison (Zeydanlioglu 2009 ). While the original aim of the PKK was an independent and united Kurdistan across...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2007) 3 (1): 58–85.
Published: 01 March 2007
... recognition from the Swedish government (see below). The most ex- treme example is Kurdish women organizing in Turkey, where they are allowed to organize as feminists, but are subject to state violence if they organize as Kurdish feminists. At the same time, the feminist agenda and solidarity work...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2019) 15 (1): 125–134.
Published: 01 March 2019
... Policy in the Age of AKP .” South European Society and Politics 16 , no. 4 : 555 – 73 . Diner Çağla , and Toktaş Şule . 2010 . “ Waves of Feminism in Turkey: Kemalist, Islamist, and Kurdish Women’s Movements in an Era of Globalization .” Journal of Balkan and Near Eastern Studies...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2012) 8 (1): 63–91.
Published: 01 March 2012
...” of political prisoners in Turkey gave faces and names to their disap- peared sons and daughters at public demonstrations and developed new social networks through political action, Kurdish women Anfal survi- vors faced a series of economic, social, and gender-related constraints in...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2016) 12 (2): 284–287.
Published: 01 July 2016
... consistently foregrounded in the Kurdish movement. For example, Turkey’s Kurdish People’s Democratic Party political parties “proudly represent at least 40% women.” One can argue that “the strength of the resulting women’s movement illustrates that the point in establishing structures such as copresidency (one...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2017) 13 (1): 186–188.
Published: 01 March 2017
... a different future remains uncertain. While the woman pilot flying the F16 over Istanbul on July 15 is likened to Sabiha Gökçen, the first woman pilot of the nation-state, who bombed the Kurdish dominated Dersim in 1937, how should we understand the women resisting against the coup now on the...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2012) 8 (1): 92–114.
Published: 01 March 2012
..., memory, gender, urban-rural dynamics, and knowledge production. Her Ph.D. thesis on resistance and the making of collective identity in Iraqi Kurdistan was published in 2003 by the European Centre for Kurdish Studies in Berlin. Her monograph, Brave men, pretty women? Gender and symbolic violence in...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2017) 13 (1): 189–193.
Published: 01 March 2017
... located in Saraçhane, in front of the gigantic Istanbul Municipality building, with a banner: “Coups can only be foiled by peace. Women are against war” ( fig. 4 ). They were carrying posters drawing attention to the war crimes committed by soldiers against the Kurdish populations of southeastern Turkey...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2007) 3 (2): 115–117.
Published: 01 July 2007
... expatriate businesswomen relate interactions with more conservative Turks. In one story, the younger women of a family from a Kurdish village are transplanted to western Turkey to work as fi eld labor- ers. Th e reader gets only glimpses of the lives that most Turkish families lead, an...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2018) 14 (1): 116–123.
Published: 01 March 2018
... Cagla , Toktaş and Şule . 2010 . “ Waves of Feminism in Turkey: Kemalist, Islamist, and Kurdish Women’s Movements in an Era of Globalization .” Journal of Balkan and Near Eastern Studies 12 , no. 1 : 41 – 57 . Gökarıksel Banu . 2007 . “ A Feminist Geography of Veiling: Gender...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2016) 12 (2): 225–245.
Published: 01 July 2016
..., conservative, culturally Muslim, middle- to high-class, and Turkish (as an ethnic self-identification in relation to primarily the Kurdish identity). An ideal Turkish man is expected to be an obedient son to his father and deeply devoted to his mother (Helvacıoğlu 2006 ; Kandiyoti 1987 ) and to prove himself...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2016) 12 (3): 382–410.
Published: 01 November 2016
... ; Marksist.org 2010 ; Yurt Newspaper 2014 ). However, enforced disappearance became a hidden reality in Turkey first during the coup and mostly during 1990s when any opposition was brutally suppressed (Alpkaya 1995 ; Öndül 2011 ). The military/paramilitary forces tortured mostly leftist or Kurdish people in...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2008) 4 (1): 31–52.
Published: 01 March 2008
...- cent scholarship on Armenian and Kurdish feminism in the late Ottoman and early republican periods reveals that crosscurrents, infl uences, and at times contention existed between the ethnically diverse elites (Alakom 1998; Ekmekçioğlu and Bilal 2006). Further research is needed to explore these...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2016) 12 (3): 306–322.
Published: 01 November 2016
... years after the Syrian uprising began, ISIS became a major political player in the Levant. By the fall of 2014 it had taken over vast tracts of land and was expanding rapidly. When the siege of Kobanî began in September 2014, images of Kurdish women once again made the front page around the world. Like...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2015) 11 (3): 350–353.
Published: 01 November 2015
... Houzan Mahmoud ( 2014 ) writes, women Kurdish fighters are integrated and often serve as military commanders in the “fierce fight against ISIS,” which also “poses important challenges to feminist peace theorizing.” Women in Turkey who want freedom in their personal lives, including Muslims, have a...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2017) 13 (1): 178–180.
Published: 01 March 2017
... . 2010 . “ Between Gift and Taboo: Death and the Negotiation of National Identity and Sovereignty in the Kurdish Conflict in Turkey .” PhD diss., University of Texas at Austin . ...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2017) 13 (2): 195–218.
Published: 01 July 2017
... concludes by arguing for the need to move beyond the Islamic versus secular divide and to denaturalize and dehomogenize the role of religion in the public sphere. Copyright © 2017 by the Association for Middle East Women’s Studies 2017 reproductive rights religion Turkey Islam versus secular divide...