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Arabic autobiography

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Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2010) 6 (3): 149–182.
Published: 01 November 2010
... Banat al-Riyadh into English as a case study, I argue that revisions made by press and author to my translation assimilated it to chick-lit generic conventions in the anglophone marketplace, muting the gender politics and situatedness of multiple kinds of Arabic that acted, in the original novel, as a...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2015) 11 (2): 179–198.
Published: 01 July 2015
... discusses Abouzeid’s engagement with tensions triggered by colonial encounters and postcolonial nation building. Copyright © 2015 by the Association for Middle East Women’s Studies 2015 postcolonial female agency Leila Abouzeid Arabic autobiography Moroccan autobiography Arab women’s writing...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2015) 11 (2): 199–215.
Published: 01 July 2015
... University Press . Golley Nawar Al-Hassan . 2003 . Reading Arab Women’s Autobiographies: Shahrazad Tells Her Story . Austin : University of Texas Press . González Jennifer A. 1995 . “ Autotopographies .” In Prosthetic Territories: Politics and Hypertechnologies , edited by Brahm...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2015) 11 (2): 161–178.
Published: 01 July 2015
... sent away to remove her from the presidential gaze. Autobiography has a long history in the Arab literary tradition, dating as far back as the ninth century (Reynolds 2001 , 2). Women writers have strived to generate works that would become part of that tradition. Fadia Faqir ( 1998 , 8) points...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2019) 15 (3): 286–306.
Published: 01 November 2019
... that it was harder for her to write autobiography as an Arab woman, because “uncovering one’s private life is considered bold and indecent in Arab society, especially when done by a woman.” This lens was certainly applied to Wanisi’s writing. In an article about Wanisi’s work, Noureddine Saʿidani...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2011) 7 (3): 71–97.
Published: 01 November 2011
...Jared McCormick This inquiry explores questions of movement and tourism in relation to sexuality within the context of Lebanon’s nascent gay travel industry. The first section examines how imagery of Arab men is mediatized and circulated, with (un)intended effects. Many of the images take form...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2017) 13 (2): 265–286.
Published: 01 July 2017
...-Tahawy al-Khibaʾ ( The Tent ) Arab women writers autobiography authorial double The creative artist is always in a state of agitation and rebellion and cannot accept the place without interrogating it, even if possessed by fears. —Miral al-Tahawy (quoted in al-Khalil 2007...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2017) 13 (1): 69–70.
Published: 01 March 2017
...miriam cooke Copyright © 2017 by the Association for Middle East Women’s Studies 2017 Less than forty years ago Arab women creative writers were virtually unknown at home and abroad. The two celebrated exceptions, the Syrian Colette Khoury and the Lebanese Layla Baalbaki, who had published...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2017) 13 (1): 124–127.
Published: 01 March 2017
...Mejdulene B. Shomali Anxiety of Erasure: Trauma, Authorship, and the Diaspora in Arab Women’s Writing . Al-Samman Hanadi . Syracuse, NY : Syracuse University Press , 2015 . 294 pages. isbn 9780815634027. An Imperialist Love Story: Desert Romances and the War on Terror...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2013) 9 (2): 1–3.
Published: 01 July 2013
...miriam cooke Miriam cooke is Braxton Craven Distinguished Professor of Arab Cultures and Director of the Middle East Studies Center at Duke University. Her early writings focused on the intersection of gender and war in modern Arabic literature and on Arab women writers’ constructions of...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2017) 13 (3): 453–457.
Published: 01 November 2017
... figures of critical dissent. Her first book, Resistance Literature (1987), brought together writings of national liberation struggles from Africa, Latin America, and the Arab world. She challenged the isolationism of area studies and the formalist tendencies of literary criticism that claim literature...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2018) 14 (1): 25–44.
Published: 01 March 2018
... ) describes a regrettable tendency among Arab writers to use the European and foreign “focus on sexual nudity found in Rousseau,” forgetting “the vast difference between the social system and the view of life among us and Europe.” The poet Buland al-Haidari, in contrast, praises Ayyub’s candid autobiography...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2017) 13 (1): 87–106.
Published: 01 March 2017
..., women became the symbol of this authentic, particular identity and were thus burdened with the extremely difficult task of being simultaneously modern and traditional. Western readings of Arab and Egyptian feminisms exacerbate this problematic framework of representation. Despite extensive and...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2013) 9 (2): 4–31.
Published: 01 July 2013
... role of literacy, both in the narrower sense of reading and writing and in the broader senses of interpretative skill and inclusion within the realm of Arabic letters, in Musa’s Ta’rikhi bi-qalami. Margot Badran (1992, 271) describes Musa’s autobiography as “a major document in the history...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2019) 15 (3): 423–429.
Published: 01 November 2019
... PhD project studies life stories written by contemporary Anglophone Arab women writers, both at home and in the diaspora. These narratives play a particular role in shaping Arab women’s literature by using English to reclaim cultural, historical, social, and political self-representation. I...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2019) 15 (3): 367–372.
Published: 01 November 2019
...Deema Kaedbey Bad Girls of the Arab World . Nadia Yaqub and Rula Quawas , eds. Austin : University of Texas Press , 2017 . 239 pages. isbn 9781477313350 . Freedom without Permission: Bodies and Space in the Arab Revolutions , Frances S. Hasso and Zakia...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2016) 12 (2): 291–295.
Published: 01 July 2016
... in French throughout the novel. French, her “stepmother’s tongue,” allows her to travel between texts, between French and Arabic, between written and oral (Djebar 1993 , 214). “Autobiography practiced in the enemy’s language has the texture of fiction. . . . While I thought I was undertaking a...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2015) 11 (1): 80–97.
Published: 01 March 2015
... telling the stories of others, usually women, to provide nuance and counterpoint to the central narrative. Both texts offer forms of “multiple critique” that give voice to women treated as objects in Moroccan society. The texts are otherwise quite different. Tomorrow is a novel written in Arabic in...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2014) 10 (3): 131–133.
Published: 01 November 2014
..., and stories of the young girls and their families, the reader is pushed to challenge existing conceptualizations of women as a homogenous category and to move away from the view of Arab women as passive victims of their society. As the author may strengthen her argument by stressing the...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2018) 14 (3): 356–358.
Published: 01 November 2018
..., Ryzova draws on sources such as films, autobiographies, novels, photographs, and periodicals (especially advertisements) to produce a “‘thick’ description of the efendi, of vernacular modernity” (31). The second question is explored first, in chapter 2, which argues convincingly that the effendi...