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Arab women’s writing

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Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2019) 15 (1): 117–124.
Published: 01 March 2019
... in 2008. This activity aimed to provide the opportunity and encouragement for Arab immigrant and refugee women to express themselves through creative writing in Arabic, their mother language. We helped them narrate the stories of their lives, including the difficulties, contradictions, and challenges...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2017) 13 (3): 438–441.
Published: 01 November 2017
... local regimes in the Arabic-speaking world insist that all people in that world are Arabs. Dissident Writings of Arab Women is replete with monolithic representations of women, as well as errors of interpretation and omissions. In the first three sections of the book, the term Maghreb is often...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2018) 14 (2): 233–234.
Published: 01 July 2018
...Brinda Mehta Editors’ Note: Dissident Writings of Arab Women: Voices against Violence won the African Literature Association’s 2016 Book of the Year Award for “its originality, meticulous research, detailed analysis, nuances, anti-essentialist negotiations of identity, thought-provoking...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2012) 8 (2): 1–25.
Published: 01 July 2012
... time I hit roadblocks and stumbled onto pathways, pursuing what at times appeared to me an unspeakable subject, an unwritable concept, an unanswerable query. At the time, few scholars were theorizing Arab families or Arab women as subjects. Few writing about the Arab world were...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2013) 9 (1): 81–109.
Published: 01 March 2013
... listserv came about haphazardly when I took on an assignment to write an encyclopedia entry on the Arab Women’s Solidarity Association International. Suddenly, I found the intellectual refuge that I had been seeking. I joined the listserv, AWSA United, and was invited to participate in...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2019) 15 (2): 232–234.
Published: 01 July 2019
...Danya Al-Saleh On the Arab-Jew, Palestine, and Other Displacements: Selected Writings . Ella Shohat . London : Pluto , 2017 . xv + 464 pages. isbn 9780745399508 (cloth), 9780745399492 (paper). Copyright © 2019 by the Association for Middle East Women’s Studies 2019 Ella...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2006) 2 (2): 143–146.
Published: 01 July 2006
...Rita Stephan Women and Globalization in the Arab Middle East: Gender, Economy and Society , Doumato Eleanor Abdella Posusney Marsha Pripstein , eds. Boulder, CO : Lynne Rienner , 2003 . Copyright © 2006 Association for Middle East Women’s Studies 2006...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2006) 2 (1): 95–121.
Published: 01 March 2006
... in the anthropology of literature. Her articles on Arab women’s writing have appeared in journals and edited volumes. Her current research interests include Egyptian women’s literature as social discourse and Arabic language retention and processes of Americanization among Arab Americans...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2016) 12 (3): 453–454.
Published: 01 November 2016
.... This dissertation emphasizes that British literary culture and experience are not very different from Arab women’s literary experience of madness. This study examines two texts against a backdrop of Bedouin culture in an effort to call for the integration of “Bedouin studies” and “Bedouin texts” into...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2016) 12 (3): 422–424.
Published: 01 November 2016
...Ghenwa Hayek Writing Beirut: Mappings of the City in the Modern Arabic Novel . Aghacy Samira . Edinburgh : Edinburgh University Press , 2015 . 206 pages. isbn 9780748696246 Copyright © 2016 by the Association for Middle East Women’s Studies 2016 Samira Aghacy’s Writing...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2017) 13 (1): 69–70.
Published: 01 March 2017
... commonplace to see women’s names alongside those of men on the lists of all major literary prizes for Arabic literature. Among Arab countries, Egypt has witnessed the largest production of feminist writings. Virtually unnoticed in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, because they were writing...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2009) 5 (2): 53–82.
Published: 01 July 2009
... [Arabic] script, they are impossible for the younger generation to use. 66  JOURNAL OF MIDDLE EAST WOMEN’S STUDIES 5:2 As a result, we have collected, edited, and organized these memoirs and arranged them in a manner that in no way distorts their meaning, and we now present...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2007) 3 (2): 31–55.
Published: 01 July 2007
... politics. I focus particularly on literary narratives published in the first four decades of the twentieth century. Hoda Elsadda holds the Chair in the Study of the Contemporary Arab World at Manchester University. She was a co-founder and co-editor of Hagar , an interdisciplinary journal of women’s...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2010) 6 (1): 46–74.
Published: 01 March 2010
...Noor Al-Qasimi This article examines how the phenomenon of the ‘abaya-as-fashion is accommodated by the hegemonic order of Islamic patriarchy in the region of the Arab Gulf states. The traditional ‘abaya, or body veil commonly worn by national women across the Arab Gulf, is juxtaposed against...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2017) 13 (2): 265–286.
Published: 01 July 2017
...-Tahawy al-Khibaʾ ( The Tent ) Arab women writers autobiography authorial double The creative artist is always in a state of agitation and rebellion and cannot accept the place without interrogating it, even if possessed by fears. —Miral al-Tahawy (quoted in al-Khalil 2007...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2010) 6 (3): 149–182.
Published: 01 November 2010
... they have revived 156  JOURNAL OF MIDDLE EAST WOMEN’S STUDIES 6:3 cloak-and-dagger formulae in “Islamic” form, albeit with the purported aim, sometimes, of “understanding the Other.” I am not suggesting that Arab, Turkish, and Iranian writers are deliberately writing to be...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2007) 3 (1): 6–34.
Published: 01 March 2007
..., whose activities led to a reform of the Moroccan personal status code (the Mudawwana ) in 2003. The discourse of the second generation of Tunisian women, which emerged, unlike that of women in other Arab Muslim countries, in a post-independence context wherein they benefited from an oft-amended PSC that...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2009) 5 (3): 175–182.
Published: 01 November 2009
... women everywhere—but they also contend with the fact that original sources prior to the 1928 adop- tion of the Turkish reform alphabet, which replaced the Ottoman script (in Arabic characters), are now indecipherable to all but specialists. WOMEN’S ARCHIVES AND LIBRARIES WORLDWIDE...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2014) 10 (2): 1–30.
Published: 01 July 2014
...Katja Žvan Elliott This article examines the rarely talked about subtleties of Moroccan reform in the realm of women’s rights and its inadequate fulfillment of obligations to international human rights standards. The Preamble to Morocco’s post-Arab Spring 2011 constitution follows the example of...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2015) 11 (2): 179–198.
Published: 01 July 2015
... the self is inscribed in terms of others is especially relevant for conceptualizing the fraught and often paradoxical spaces that produce Arab women’s subjectivities. Such writing often expresses the pressures of marginalization versus empowerment; conformity versus subversion; representing oneself...