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Author notes

Banu Gökariksel is Assistant Professor of Geography at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Her research engages with questions about neoliberal globalization, dimensions of public space, and identity-formation through contemporary everyday Islamic and secular practices and ideologies in Turkey. She has been doing ethnographic fieldwork in Istanbul since 1996. Her primary research questions have examined competing and contested secular and Islamic visions and practices of contingent modernity in mall spaces, cultural politics of dress, and consumer capitalism. Her publications have appeared in the journals Area, Global Networks, Social and Cultural Geography, and Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers, and in Women, Religion, and Space: Global Perspectives on Gender and Faith (ed. Karen Morin and Jeanne Guelke, 2007). She is currently collaborating with Anna Secor on a National Science Foundation–funded project on the transnational veiling-fashion industry based in Turkey.

Ellen McLarney is Andrew W. Mellon Assistant Professor in the Department of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies at Duke University. She is currently working on feminist theologies of the Islamic revival in Egypt, focusing on how women’s emancipation is configured in religious terms, and in particular how Islamist writers interpret the submission of Islam as a form of liberation. She took her doctoral degree from Columbia University in the fields of Comparative Literature and Middle Eastern Studies. She was a Humanities Fellow in the Department of Religious Studies at Stanford University; at Duke, she teaches Arabic Language and Cultural Studies. McLarney has published articles in Feminist Theory, boundary2, Research in African Literatures, ADFL Bulletin, Journal of Arabic Literature, Journal of North African Studies, and Islamic Quarterly.

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