Ten years after what has been popularly called the “Arab Spring,” amid a decade of reflections, analysis, research, activism, and lived experience, the SWANA Feminist Collective emerged to provide an alternate account of shared struggles against colonial-imperialist and neoliberal encroachment in the region. Dominant Eurocentric academic analyses have often focused on subjects, actions, movements, institutional powers, and discussions on “failures” and “lessons” or the nostalgic and romanticized memorialization of revolutions (Shihade and Shihade 2012). These narratives echo the Orientalist narrative that has long been produced in academic institutions in the global North and elsewhere and has been critically addressed by postcolonial and anticolonial (feminist) scholars (e.g., Abu-Lughod 2013; Mohanty 1988; Said 1978; Shihade and Shihade 2012).

The function of overromanticized or oversimplified narratives of the 2011 revolutions is similar to that of the colonially constituted Orientalist ones, often producing the category of the SWANA region...

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