The Kurdish Women’s Freedom Movement is a powerful and illuminating account of the Kurdish women’s decades-long struggle for freedom and equality in Kurdistan. Drawing on her extensive ethnographic research in three different locations—Diyarbakir, an unnamed mountain camp of female guerrillas, and Maxmûr refugee camp—Isabel Käser not only provides a nuanced and in-depth analysis of the Kurdish women’s movement but also sheds light on the experiences, perspectives, struggles, and achievements of Kurdish women against the backdrop of the Kurdish struggle for freedom and independence/autonomy since the late 1970s in the four countries among which historical Kurdistan is divided: Turkey, Syria, Iraq, and Iran.

Staying true to the principles of feminist research, Käser reveals her positionality, reflects constantly on the possible impact of her assumptions and sympathy toward women’s achievements, prioritizes women’s perspectives and practices, acknowledges the limitations of her empirical data, and focuses on the gender and power relations in the...

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