Inside a nondescript clinic in Dearborn, Michigan, refugees from Lebanon, Iraq, Yemen, and Palestine disclose personal histories shaped by both war and infertility. They are not unrelated experiences, as Marcia C. Inhorn demonstrates throughout this book. The ethnographic accounts she collects over her five years of study vividly collapse the health consequences of conflict, exile, and poverty into the frame of reproductive care in America. What possibilities remain for men and women in the double exile from reproductive futures and war-ravaged homelands? Moreover, what should be done to help Arab refugees establish lives and livelihoods? Inhorn contributes important language to these struggles in her conceptualization of “reproductive exile,” and this work unfolds as a testament to the pain and prospects of making lives and families under the terms of US resettlement.

America’s Arab Refugees is built on Inhorn’s...

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