In Sofian Merabet’s Queer Beirut, a walk through the Lebanese capital is far from a momentary stroll. War, violence, and their reconstructive aftermaths carve and recarve the possible routes along which one can wander. The cafés, offices, malls, public baths, and homes that dot the city’s paths, as well as the histories they harbor and retreats they offer, continue to evolve in tandem with tempos of conflict and commercialization, de- and redevelopment. With rich ethnographic care, Merabet walks his readers through Beirut’s streets, attentive to how the Lebanese Civil War (1985–90) reshaped its topography, and how processes of “repair” resonate in landmarks, beaches, and storefronts. Against a backdrop of architectural, infrastructural, demographic, and political change, he asks: How do queer individuals and groups navigate this continually evolving city in order to live, love, and enact their own...

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