When asked to write a preface for this themed issue, “Decolonizing Sex and Sexuality,” I thought right away of the Moroccan writer, thinker, and sociologist Abdelkebir Khatibi (1983, 47), who in Maghreb pluriel (Plural Maghreb) argued for “a decolonization that would be, at the same time, a deconstruction.” Khatibi explains that the notion of deconstruction is borrowed “from Jacques Derrida, to the extent that 1) his thinking is also in dialogue with the ‘overtaking of metaphysics’; . . . 2) deconstruction, as a shaking up of Western metaphysics and as carried out by Derrida in his own unique way, accompanied decolonization as a historical phenomenon” (47–48n1). He then assigns a specifically Arab valence to deconstruction: “Like all sociology of decolonization, the one coming out of the Arab world consists in carrying out a deconstruction of logocentrism and of ethnocentrism, that word of self-sufficiency par excellence...

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