I have understood part of miriam cooke’s work over the years to embody a commitment to understanding the forms of cultural production that emerge in the context of life beside a corpse or, following Sarah Kofman (2007, 241), living on in the face of the intolerable. In her early book War’s Other Voices, cooke (1987) writes about the “Beirut Decentrists” and returns repeatedly to literature that engages the corpse. In a piece in the collection The Moon’s Tears, Wisal Khalid writes of “Tariq who died in good health and all his parts were new” (37). When his mother takes his corpse to the hospital, the staff turns her away because they do not handle cadavers, so she puts him in the refrigerator. Engaging the equally surreal world of Ghada Samman’s Beirut Nightmares...

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