Madeline Otis Campbell’s Interpreters of Occupation provides an intimate account of the United States’ gendered and imperialist practices in the Middle East. Her narrative revolves around the experiences of ten mostly young, university-educated, English-speaking Iraqi women and men hired as interpreters for the US occupation forces. As violence escalated in Iraq, interpreters’ role as conduits of US power in the region put their lives in danger, leading them to seek asylum in the United States. It is through Campbell’s temporary contract working for the US refugee admissions program that she first meets her interlocutors. Deploying a multisited methodology, initially traveling to Iraq to meet asylum claimants and then maintaining contact with them once they resettled in New England, Campbell traces their processes of subjectivation and resubjectivation across several boundaries—first inside and outside US bases in Iraq and then...

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