The theme of this issue, “Gendered and Sexual Mobilities,” opens onto several possibilities regarding the significance of mobility for our understanding of difference—gendered and sexual difference, to be sure, but also questions of race, class, religion, and ethnicity. Drawing on the articles in this issue, I will discuss three tacks one can take in approaching questions of mobility and difference. This is not an exhaustive typology of approaches to mobility and difference, of course, but a heuristic for understanding the ways that these four articles contribute to this field.

First, mobility can call subjects into question, can mark them as different and dangerous and therefore potential objects of surveillance and regulatory intervention. As Tim Cresswell (2006) argues, mobile peoples (such as nomads, Roma, Jews, traveling performers, migrants, and refugees) have historically been cast as threatening to...

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