My dissertation research focuses on blind women’s gender identity and the cultural representations of sight and blindness in the Israeli public sphere. Arguing for the ways blindness as a social, cultural, and physical phenomenon offers the opportunity to challenge social binaries and rethink social otherness, the research integrates the scholarships of feminist disability studies, anthropology of the senses, and visual culture into a scholarly conversation. My multisensory methodological and analytic approach focuses on the production of “sensory knowledge” in the field and the tactile, sonic, and olfactory experiences of blind people. The work is based on three years of ethnographic study, including interviews with forty women, most of whom are congenitally blind, and observations in several sites offering services to blind and visually impaired people and/or presenting aspects of blindness to the general public. The research provides a...

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