One may expect an account that opens with diaspora, persecution, and trauma in a Jewish context to conclude with Zionism or “Jewish and democratic” as the circumventing script that counters past and prevents future violence. Accordingly, one may also expect diaspora and violence to be used interchangeably. That Sarah Schulman’s book opens with diaspora, persecution, and trauma but arrives at totally different conclusions is one of the significant contributions of her political journey and memoir. Schulman constructs a chronological account of her emergence as a supporter of the boycott, divestment, and sanctions (BDS) movement, which is enriched by the unresolved entanglement of contested identities, sites of accountability, and political struggles. Structured around two events and the moments that precede and follow them, the book opens with “Before” (introd.)—that is, before “Awareness” (chap. 1)—and thereafter leads to “Understanding” (chap....

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