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words and objects

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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2015) 45 (2): 287–321.
Published: 01 May 2015
...Jessica Brantley A hybrid of letters and pictures arranged to signify a sentence or phrase, the rebus transforms objects into ideas more explicitly than any other kind of communicative system. Its fundamental mechanism of representation enacts a connection between words and things and evokes...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2013) 43 (2): 219–245.
Published: 01 May 2013
... not only find connections between grace and physics, but that knowledge of the physics of qualities brings considerable nuance to why men and women used holy words, objects, and actions as ingredients in cures. Standing alongside the extensive scholarship on magic and the supernatural, this article...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2011) 41 (1): 13–65.
Published: 01 January 2011
... how the De Bry compilations both disclose and enclose the pluralities of the worlds their travelers encountered, negotiating through word and image the dialectics of difference and similarity. The complex intertwining of religious, ethnographic, and scientific impulses in this monumental publishing...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2002) 32 (3): 433–468.
Published: 01 September 2002
.... This is their Fetich —a word to which the Portuguese first gave currency, and which is derived from feitizo, magic. Here, in the Fetich, a kind of objective independence as contrasted with the arbitrary fancy of the individual seems to manifest itself; but as the objectivity is nothing other...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2000) 30 (1): 101–124.
Published: 01 January 2000
...,” and “Philosophers” may mark political as well as professional differences, since “wit,” Coiro notes, is “a code word not only for the talent but also for the Royalist bent of Mose- ley’s authors.”21 Faced with the talent so objectively manifest in this printed book...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2000) 30 (3): 547–574.
Published: 01 September 2000
... cospatial, cotemporal word, “Here.” Only the diary, first object in the series, remains recalcitrantly other, “refus[ing] to disclose its identity,” and of course it’s the diary that’s both most important and most intimately...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2014) 44 (3): 457–467.
Published: 01 September 2014
... human perception and use consti- tuted, and were constituted by, sacred objects. In its earliest sense, the word object refers simply to “something placed before or presented to the eyes or other senses.”20 For early thinkers, that is, the object consists of that which is perceived; always...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2012) 42 (3): 745–747.
Published: 01 September 2012
... should not exceed 10,000 words. Illustrations accompanying a manuscript should be submitted in the form of camera-­ready, glossy prints or TIFF digital files and must be provided with permissions for their repro- duction. For return of manuscripts, please include an SASE. We do not con- sider...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2013) 43 (1): 145–172.
Published: 01 January 2013
... of middle voice causality in which agency is shared by object and user.20 Bruno Latour, citing Gibson, uses the word actant to designate the way in which things “might authorize, allow, afford, encourage, permit, suggest, influence, block, render possible, forbid, and so on.”21 Affordances offer...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2015) 45 (3): 543–556.
Published: 01 September 2015
... moral and calligraphic significance.16 The multiple interactions between word and image in these engravings recode the relationship between the immaterial and material, subject and object, form and meaning. These engravings with their vibrant mosaics of fabric challenge the divisions we set up...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2010) 40 (2): 223–247.
Published: 01 May 2010
... of visual representation in Byzantium are encoded in those episodes in the narrative in which an artist prepares to make a saint's portrait. In the process, the episodes offer provocative ruminations on the relations between a representation and its prototype, words and images, sight versus hearing...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2003) 33 (1): 143–177.
Published: 01 January 2003
... a matter of mimetic representationalism—a matter, in other words, of referentiality. Hunt concludes, What I find useful there is the (muted) acknowledgment of rep- resentation’s outward reference (to actual objects or even ideas) as well as of its self-reference. This is not language...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2009) 39 (2): 305–330.
Published: 01 May 2009
... not present in their immedi- ate environment. Olson summarizes the implications of the development of a metalanguage which turn[s] the thoughts themselves into worthy objects of contempla- tion. It becomes worthwhile to try to determine the meanings of words and provide...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2003) 33 (2): 215–239.
Published: 01 May 2003
... to understand in order that I might believe; rather I believe in order that I might understand].1 When I first studied this text many years ago, I thought I had Anselm trapped from the word go: if the argument was designed to stand alone, then how could it possibly demand belief as its premise? I now think...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2001) 31 (3): 477–506.
Published: 01 September 2001
... it is overdetermined by sacred discursive practices (and vice versa). The word for God and the word for a man higher up in the social hierarchy is often the same: senhor in Occi- tan, seigneur in French. In both cases, the om enters his senhoratge. As is so frequently the case, registers are mixed in this poem...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2014) 44 (3): 549–583.
Published: 01 September 2014
... overthrown. The iconoclast responds to the object’s power with open force or parodic inversion: in Yaxley, Gunton reports, sol- diers “break open the Church doors, piss in the Font, and then baptize a horse and mare, using the solemn words of Baptism, and signing them with the sign of the cross...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2014) 44 (3): 531–548.
Published: 01 September 2014
... / 2014 these accounts, in other words, the body of the martyr is front and center, its gore representative of redemption, its function devotional and catechetical. The familiarity between recusant and martyr was thus not only personal but also tactile: Catholic families knew these martyrs...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2014) 44 (1): 135–161.
Published: 01 January 2014
... through the exercises and finally discern the divine will that his own decision needs to reflect. The indifference that Ignatius advocates is, in other words, a methodological indifference that is the condition of the exercitant’s attention — one might be tempted to say “objective” or “unbiased...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2020) 50 (2): 269–291.
Published: 01 May 2020
... is to reduce the saints to analogues of glistende wordes . . . empti withinnen, beau- tiful objects whose fascinating exterior serves only to hide a fundamental betrayal. The offers made to these two saints introduce the cold economy of idolatry only by implication in Sancte Katerine, Maxentius makes...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2002) 32 (1): 17–40.
Published: 01 January 2002
... of the term seems warranted. The word appropriate, “to make one’s own,” comes to us from the Latin proprius, “proper,” or “property,” which points to a system of objects within which valued artifacts circulate and are given meanings and underscores the way in which appropriation is an act of pos- sessing...