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triumph

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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2005) 35 (3): 489–508.
Published: 01 September 2005
...James Simpson © by Duke University Press 2005 Subjects of Triumph and Literary History: Dido and Petrarch in Petrarch’s Africa and Trionfi...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2019) 49 (2): 319–345.
Published: 01 May 2019
... reanimating older religious practices. In this first significant afterlife for the Chester plays, the 1578 staging of the Shepherds , framed by a Terence play and a series of outdoor “triumphs,” placed the pageant in a unique configuration of performances highlighting the intertwined interests of Earl Henry...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2008) 38 (2): 229–252.
Published: 01 May 2008
...-century mayoral processions similarly made use of scents to display London’s civic and economic power.28 Thomas Middleton’s Triumphs of Honour and Industry (1617) and Triumphs of Hon- our and Virtue (1622) employed elaborate staging of “all manners” of “spice plants and trees bearing odour...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2013) 43 (1): 173–190.
Published: 01 January 2013
... commercializing of public space. A month after the entertainment at Islington, Londoners were treated to another lavish civic entertainment devised by Middleton. The Triumphs of Truth, which celebrated Thomas Myddelton’s appointment as Lord Mayor, was the most elaborate and expensive inaugural...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2016) 46 (2): 339–379.
Published: 01 May 2016
... suffering in an anagogical hell, but Christ’s triumph in a literal hell.37 However, for understanding the particular visuality of Peter Dell’s Resurrection relief, the most important parts of Luther’s sermon are his corollary statements about the function of representations of hell. Hell...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2005) 35 (3): 629–662.
Published: 01 September 2005
... pictorial tradition of Petrarch’s Triumphs and had taken on a life of its own in popular prints and festive culture This vernacular tradition is enriched, however, as an embodied and even eroticized Amor emerges in poetic and artistic genres derived from classical mythology. His emergence can also...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2010) 40 (2): 347–371.
Published: 01 May 2010
... narratives of triumph, and this association offered an important model for the kind of poetic identity formation that the laurel served to legitimate.18 In Book I of the Metamorphoses, a key text for late medieval and early modern under- standings of the nature of laureation, Ovid is careful to place...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2003) 33 (3): 387–402.
Published: 01 September 2003
... that it was a woman by nature. The old man marveled and said, “See how women triumph over Satan, and we behave shamefully in the cities.” Having given thanks to God, who pro- tects those who love him, we went away. 18 This version makes explicit that the story is told...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2012) 42 (2): 269–305.
Published: 01 May 2012
... Queens’ College, Cambridge, shows her with the devil- as- dragon under- foot. The next day, she is stripped naked before a large crowd, branded, boiled, and finally beheaded. Her death itself is a triumph. Just before she meekly bows her head to receive the sword, an earthquake encourages five...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2003) 33 (1): 23–45.
Published: 01 January 2003
... As in classical Roman triumphs, we witness the imperial triumpha- tor, Arcadius, his faithful army (the bishops), and the screaming throngs (populi, as Jerome appropriately calls them) cheering on his victory. We fur- ther witness their beloved prophet Samuel, yet here we might pause to con...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2003) 33 (3): 517–536.
Published: 01 September 2003
... while simultaneously interrogating their assumptions about sacrilege and sanctity, triumph and defeat. 32 The strategy had, in a sense, already been employed by Juvencus as later it would inspire Prudentius and Paulinus of Nola. 33 But here, at a crucial juncture in Rome’s history, the public...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2009) 39 (1): 143–159.
Published: 01 January 2009
... their ashes come,” exclaiming, “Triumph, my Britain! Thou hast one to show / To whom all scenes of Europe homage owe.” What Jonson has left us, it seems, is a well-defined national canon that places Shakespeare at the apex not only of English but of European cultural productions. As I...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2010) 40 (3): 425–438.
Published: 01 September 2010
... “sac- ramentalism” succeeded by the “secularism” of “modernity.”5 The current historiographical situation for writing about the early- ­sixteenth-­century English Reformation has been shaped by the triumph of what is often called “revisionism.” This triumph can be observed in a shift from...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2005) 35 (3): 457–466.
Published: 01 September 2005
... predecessors. In “Subjects of Triumph and Literary History: Dido and Petrarch in Petrarch’s Africa and Trionfi ,” Simpson examines two of Petrarch’s Trionfi , that of Cupid and of Chastity, to show that literary history is created as a result of repeated sub- missions to an imperial project. By reshaping...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2016) 46 (1): 1–5.
Published: 01 January 2016
... medical lan- guage. Sontag’s critique of medical metaphor has been powerfully influential —  although the language of battle, victory, and triumph continues to be strik- ingly common in discussions of cancer in particular. But metaphor, as these essays show over and over again, works in many ways...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2009) 39 (1): 119–141.
Published: 01 January 2009
... his honourable citie (and chamber) of London. James’s “triumph” is marked by all the spectacles of gaudy triumph one expects, and Dekker spares no detail in his published account.17 After quick appearances by Genius and Saints George and Andrew, and after a “camera regia” pageant featuring...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2008) 38 (2): 285–314.
Published: 01 May 2008
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2014) 44 (3): 617–643.
Published: 01 September 2014
... his opponent even at the very moment of triumph. Lambert collects a range of texts concerning the life of Alexander into a single long chapter, abridges them, and juxtaposes the parts with one another in a way that encourages the reader to assimilate these disparate nar- ratives into a coherent...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2006) 36 (2): 355–377.
Published: 01 May 2006
...; Mounts marrow-bones; cuts fifty-angled custards; Reares bulwarke pies; and, for his outer workes, He raiseth ramparts of immortall crust; And teacheth all the tacticks at one dinner: What rankes, what files, to put his dishes in; The whole Art Militarie! — Ben Jonson, Neptune’s Triumph for the...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2000) 30 (2): 247–274.
Published: 01 May 2000
... and enlist some of his most powerful nobles, eventually triumphing over his enemies in March 1322. The lever- age point for this turnaround had been Edward’s brilliant exploitation— probably even orchestration—of a confrontation in October 1321 between Queen Isabella and Margaret Badlesmere, whose...