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theatrical embodiment

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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2021) 51 (3): 497–507.
Published: 01 September 2021
...W. B. Worthen What does it mean to think about embodiment without bodies? This essay pursues a question central to all categories of performance—theatrical and extratheatrical—in the early modern period. It explores that question by considering the actions assigned to performers by early modern...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2019) 49 (1): 113–135.
Published: 01 January 2019
...Paul A. Kottman Shakespeare’s career moves from an explicit concern with theatrical drama to an increasing concern with what John Vyvyan called “the science of life.” This article argues that this increased concern with ethics led Shakespeare to stop writing tragedies. Shakespeare’s plays indeed...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2021) 51 (3): 509–531.
Published: 01 September 2021
... the mountebank's act as weak theatrical mimesis: the physician James Hart of Northampton deems mountebanks a “sort of counterfeit Physitians” who “bewitch[]” their patient-audiences with “maskes and vizards, shewes and shadowes without any substance.” 23 Characterizing the mountebank's performance as purely...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2010) 40 (1): 65–88.
Published: 01 January 2010
... not only in words, but in the contest of styles of theatrical embodiment. The heart of the scene lies in the contest not only of the players as characters, but of their invocations of their own performances as exemplary of styles of being and suffering. Two workshop anecdotes will, I hope...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2021) 51 (3): 387–395.
Published: 01 September 2021
... read the play text in a way that grants primacy to the embodied enactment of the scene by incorporating theatrical practices into her study: she may enlist classical actors, study performance histories, search the early modern dramatic record for hints about the bodies of the actors who initially...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2021) 51 (3): 453–473.
Published: 01 September 2021
..., Lincolnshire at Ashby Heath. In these instances, perambulators used the occasion of the public recognition of property boundaries as an opportunity to stage a complaint in an act of “performative law.” The complainants asserted their rights and liberties by means of a theatrical form that invited participants...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2021) 51 (3): 477–486.
Published: 01 September 2021
... as a “new historicist study.” 6 Some contributors to that volume acknowledge that dramatic literature is “in many respects a poor retainer of theatrical memory,” one that imposes a “value upon theatrical performance that is derived not from the stage's affordances, but from print's.” 7 Yet few extend...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2021) 51 (3): 487–495.
Published: 01 September 2021
... and an abbess that reveals deep connections to May games. Festivity constituted a mode of embodied knowledge, a somatic and kinesthetic process that conditioned playgoer responses. This essay demonstrates how examining nondramatic performance, including quotidian, ceremonial, and ritual practices, allows...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2016) 46 (2): 315–337.
Published: 01 May 2016
....”4 But most curiously, though it seems to be a Corpus Christi play in theme, it does not embody Christ on stage, since the play text calls for the use of a nonhuman “image” of Christ in place of an actor. As I will show, the Croxton play also paradoxically enacts anxieties about the nature...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2021) 51 (3): 431–451.
Published: 01 September 2021
... . . . but also in concrete, visible, and embodied forms, beginning in particular with the bodies that inhabit theatricalized space.” 11 Such opportunities for bodies to assemble in public, combined with their purely discursive representation in texts, allowed citizens and subjects to gather and cultivate...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2013) 43 (1): 1–24.
Published: 01 January 2013
... the intention of this essay to summarize that work. I do, however, want to address some major theoretical, philosophical, and practical debates about the nature of space and place in the world and in theatrical representation. 2  Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies / 43.1 / 2013 In doing so, I...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2013) 43 (1): 145–172.
Published: 01 January 2013
...Julia Reinhard Lupton This essay uses the concept of affordances, borrowed from design theory and environmental psychology, in order to map the use of space in act 1, scene 5 of Romeo and Juliet . Hospitality provides a socio-symbolic script for objects and persons in action that crosses theatrical...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2003) 33 (2): 281–309.
Published: 01 May 2003
...David Lawton © by Duke University Press 2003 Sacrilege and Theatricality: the Croxton Play of the Sacrament David Lawton Washington University...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2021) 51 (3): 577–585.
Published: 01 September 2021
...Carol Symes As an afterword to the special issue of JMEMS “Performance beyond Drama,” this essay reflects on the complex ways that premodern performances and their embodied actors are captured in, mediated by, or dependent on the texts that we use to study them, and on the special importance...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2013) 43 (1): 71–98.
Published: 01 January 2013
... to embody what cannot be embodied, to enact the unveiling of what can never truly be unveiled. a “Quod me nutrit me destruit”: Discovering the Abject on the Early Modern Stage...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2013) 43 (2): 369–391.
Published: 01 May 2013
...Brian Sheerin Discourses of economic exchange and of theatrical participation at the turn of the seventeenth century each began to rely on a rhetoric of “crediting”: both lending and theatergoing, that is, demand a trust in the circularity of expenditure, whereby what is given out may return...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2002) 32 (3): 433–468.
Published: 01 September 2002
... as an embodiment of the unbounded ambi- tion of Baconian science and a remnant of the culture of medieval magic, as an idealization of a superior European technology and a materialization of European letters and literacy, as the enchanted “book” of the theater and the corporeal incarnation of the sorcery...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2008) 38 (2): 229–252.
Published: 01 May 2008
... impact on contemporary produc- tions of Shakespeare and the closest approximation to date of an early mod- ern theatrical experience within modern constraints: this was Shakespeare, as one reviewer put it, without “any mustiness of the museum.”4 Productions like the Globe’s 2002 Twelfth...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2010) 40 (1): 37–63.
Published: 01 January 2010
... head and whole, the body politic itself.50 In this way, Blacman rewrites the physical identification expressed in the miracles as symbolic substitution, asserting both Henry VI’s power as king to embody the realm and his place at the top of a strongly verti- cal hierarchy modeled...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2002) 32 (2): 269–304.
Published: 01 May 2002
..., urban geography, and theatrical conventions that informed the performance.1 Unfortunately, in this it is representative of the historical record of saints’ plays and pageants, a tradition amply documented, but in so fragmentary and inci- dental a way as to make clear only its prevalence.2...