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the body and corporeality

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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2016) 46 (3): 629–651.
Published: 01 September 2016
...Arabella Milbank This essay questions the current critical attitude toward medieval understandings of the body. It tests the limits of the contemporary “corporeal turn” by reassessing a textual crux in Julian of Norwich's A Revelation of Love . Contesting the dominant, defecatory reading...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2022) 52 (3): 483–501.
Published: 01 September 2022
... as a member in a certain maner in the misticall bodye of hys catholike church, yet for lacke of the spirituall receving by clennes of sp[i]rite, he attayneth not the fruitefull thing of the sacrament . (176, my emphasis) More's decentering of Christ's corporeal body in the Eucharistic scene...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2016) 46 (1): 117–139.
Published: 01 January 2016
... seeks to understand this complex corporeal dynamic — this strug- gle for “rhetorical ownership” of the body and its diseases.8 While there was a pronounced vigorous interplay between medical and political discourses in the mid-­seventeenth century, there is no evidence of any sustained ontologi...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2024) 54 (1): 137–163.
Published: 01 January 2024
.... 4 Indeed, early modern judicial process privileged the interpretation of bodily signs at every stage of its investigation. Reading corporeal signs—what John Martin has called the “rhetorical forensics of the body”—helped the judge determine the reliability of testimony given before him. 5 While...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2011) 41 (2): 435–455.
Published: 01 May 2011
.... Los Angeles: J. Paul Getty Museum, 2010. 160 pp.; 88 color illus. $29.95. Cohen, Esther. The Modulated Scream: Pain in Late Medieval Culture. Chi- cago: University of Chicago Press, 2010. xiv, 393 pp.; 5 illus. $49.00. Diemling, Maria, and Giuseppe Veltri, eds. The Jewish Body: Corporeality...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2002) 32 (2): 227–268.
Published: 01 May 2002
... (and thus form a collective body), the chron- icle indirectly associates the shrine with the architectural space of the monastery, even as it suggests the imagery of enclosure for the spiritual body represented by the group of monks. As a symbol of permanence and purity, the dead saint’s corporeality...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2001) 31 (3): 561–584.
Published: 01 September 2001
... turn from the suffering body of his Savior to the fervent demand that his own body suffer in like fashion. Arguing that “the light and clarity of ‘remembered’ wisdom” rather than the intense pain of corporeal punishment is the subject of the poem’s end, Friedman allows the cerebral art of memory...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2011) 41 (1): 93–115.
Published: 01 January 2011
... – 1624) is the depiction of corporal violence. Indeed, the human body takes center stage in the debate over Spanish colonization of the New World, from juridical justifications for conquest and slavery to the legiti- macy of mass slaughter through a just war. Significantly, in De Bry’s Amer- ica...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2003) 33 (3): 387–402.
Published: 01 September 2003
... still living there. ( Hist. mon. 13.1–2)43 Here, too, a real woman unexpectedly appears (as the empirically minded historian might insist). In a striking transfer of corporeality, the body of the male monk loses its reality as a human body, becoming impervious to sear- ing heat, while the thin...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2013) 43 (3): 473–485.
Published: 01 September 2013
... a primary avenue to economic sta- bility and civic visibility. The major economic functions of guilds are well known: regulating craft quality and establishing local monopolies over the sale of particular items. Farr notes, “The corporate guilds to which mas- ters belonged were public bodies whose...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2024) 54 (2): 299–332.
Published: 01 May 2024
... in devotional contexts. This essay begins by considering the strange matter of Roger's body in relation to other tales of close corporeal contact with relics and then argues for reading his body as prostheticized. The next sections of the essay explore specific issues raised by the prostheticized body, showing...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2001) 31 (1): 113–146.
Published: 01 January 2001
... it character- ized, Christian texts could link corporeal difference to a foundational differ- ence in character among unbelievers. Like Isidore before him, Bartholo- maeus Anglicus found in the black body a spiritual deficiency derived from a somatic one, because...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2021) 51 (1): 9–35.
Published: 01 January 2021
...] and suffered them bodily in his body [in corpore corporaliter26 Attempting to dispel concerns about the truthfulness of Owein s account, Gilbert stresses the exact part of the story that had alarmed the audience member: the material existence of the things that Owein saw. The repeti- tion of forms of corpus...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2008) 38 (2): 285–314.
Published: 01 May 2008
... its particular political moment. By 1549, the celebrations marking the swearing in of the new mayor and the pro- cession to St. Paul’s had changed their semiotic dramatically, now present- ing with as much force as could be mustered the city as a unified body with corporate powers, perhaps...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2018) 48 (1): 11–40.
Published: 01 January 2018
... Glanvill (1636 – 1680), Abraham Cowley (1618 – 1667), or Walter Charleton (1619 – 1707) — all figures associated with the early years of Royal Society — the trope of the body as an (undiscovered) “America” came easily to hand. Within this corporeal “America” there were still islands, isthmuses...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2018) 48 (2): 261–300.
Published: 01 May 2018
...Jessica A. Boon For thirteen years, the Clarissan Juana de la Cruz (1481 – 1534) gave public “sermones” during which Christ’s voice was reported to issue from her rapt body, expanding on the biblical record and describing festivities in heaven that feature considerable fluidity in gender...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2018) 48 (1): 153–182.
Published: 01 January 2018
... body from particular parts. These parts come from both the individual illustrations and from the numerous material bodies dissected to provide the corporeal point of reference. Taken as a whole, the series of illustrations acts out the process of recomposition through the deconstruction...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2003) 33 (2): 261–280.
Published: 01 May 2003
... the Eucharist from the taint of the body” (154). Like the protestant polemicists against the Mass, a ritual defilement is deployed to save that which is most sacred. The play as a whole, argues Greenblatt, “enacts queasy rituals of defilement and revulsion, an obsession with corporeality which reduces...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2023) 53 (2): 379–404.
Published: 01 May 2023
... the outward layer. His insight corresponds to the interpretive pathway set out in Augustine's De doctrina Christiana , through which the invisible and the eternal are understood through “corporeal and temporal things.” 16 He can grasp Christ's eternal divinity by looking upon Christ's body. Andrewes's...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2013) 43 (2): 335–367.
Published: 01 May 2013
... a propitious sacrament; here, Marlowe dramatizes the rupture of the body and the word, which results in a temporarily botched ritual. Faustus’s attempt 354  Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies / 43.2 / 2013 to make his pact in the form of blood sacrifice fails both corporeally...