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temporal perception

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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2021) 51 (2): 241–262.
Published: 01 May 2021
..., Living Icon in Byzantium and Italy , 65. Byzantine icon of the Virgin Mary Church of the Blachernae in Constantinople Michael Psellos theology of miracles temporal perception Miracles in the medieval era usually entail a perceptible or quantifiable change in an existing phenomenon...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2012) 42 (3): 539–566.
Published: 01 September 2012
... Studies 42:3, Fall 2012 DOI 10.1215/10829636-­1720580  © 2012 by Duke University Press intervals of touch and voice in fingering the rosary. She experiences both immediacy and incremental “progress of time.” Temporal perception typi- cally relates to the moments it takes to complete...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2013) 43 (1): 25–48.
Published: 01 January 2013
... the built environment of the 1599 Globe Theater, we discover not one measure of space but ten: (1) geographical, (2) temporal, (3) fictional, (4) characterological, (5) social, (6) political, (7) interpersonal, (8) performative, (9) receptive, and (10) phenomenal. The confluence of the ten measures of space...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2016) 46 (1): 167–188.
Published: 01 January 2016
... and future (such as “jealou- sies” and “curiosity Both Joan Webber and Ramie Targoff account for this opening emphasis on temporal experience. In her brief but insightful reading, Webber argues that Donne’s fever accelerates his perception of time’s passage: its physical symptoms “increas[e] his view...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2011) 41 (2): 345–368.
Published: 01 May 2011
... present moment is so fleeting that it effectively possesses no duration whatsoever.8 While God’s eternal present is infinite, spanning all conceivable pasts, presents, and futures, humanity’s temporal present is infinitesimal, compressed on either side by the “past” and “future,” reduced to a span...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2014) 44 (3): 617–643.
Published: 01 September 2014
... points in the historical past and as potential springboards toward an imagined future. Throughout the Histoire ancienne, sacred objects are rendered both textually in detailed, ekphrastic prose accounts and as viv- idly illuminated images, so that these emblematic objects represent temporal...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2013) 43 (1): 1–24.
Published: 01 January 2013
..., and the extent to which multiple (parallel or virtual) realities are manufactured and manipulated by temporal and aural, as well as spatial, phenomena. A number of the essay’s theoretical, political, practical, material, and aesthetic matters are taken up in the essays that follow in this special issue...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2003) 33 (2): 241–259.
Published: 01 May 2003
....21 There is no impossible attempt to “eliminate history alto- gether,” no attempt “to represent doctrinal order” as needing to exclude con- flict, deny the materiality of the world, and negate temporality. On the con- trary, there is an attempt to encourage a perception of “the time-bound...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2003) 33 (1): 91–123.
Published: 01 January 2003
... as a temporal conduct book, instructing the reader as to how days, months, and years are to be experienced, and both Foxe’s and Cranmer’s cal- endars epitomize the two texts’ larger visions of how temporality is to be experienced. While Foxe’s calendar is filled with the names of Protestant con...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2011) 41 (2): 317–343.
Published: 01 May 2011
... — are critical for understanding a poetic and textual operation at work. As contemporary readers, we often privilege a uniform material- 318  Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies / 41.2 / 2011 ity and integrity with regard to the body and thus overlook the temporal and textual networks...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2017) 47 (1): 53–73.
Published: 01 January 2017
... Suchness 5: Experience itself Clearly, the best histories of bodies, and of space and spaces, look to the dialogue between objective fact and experience on every level, reasoned or instinctive, conscious or deep beneath perception. The same is true of the history of time itself. Microhistory, from...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2014) 44 (3): 457–467.
Published: 01 September 2014
... human perception and use consti- tuted, and were constituted by, sacred objects. In its earliest sense, the word object refers simply to “something placed before or presented to the eyes or other senses.”20 For early thinkers, that is, the object consists of that which is perceived; always...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2007) 37 (3): 595–620.
Published: 01 September 2007
... that current debates on cultural identities, terror, postcolonialism, and “globalization” need to engage with a longer temporal framework. I want to revisit several connections and fractures between differ- ent periods and spaces — medieval, early modern, and modern; “East” and “West”; England...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2013) 43 (1): 145–172.
Published: 01 January 2013
..., visibility, and interaction for quadrupeds and bipeds of a certain size. Gibson’s animals are above all animate: they move through space, and their perception largely occurs in locomotion toward a goal or away from a dan- ger, rarely resting in a position of detached contemplation. Gibson’s research...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2022) 52 (1): 41–67.
Published: 01 January 2022
... of the Holocaust consumes such linguistic or temporal inevitability. Acknowledging this threat to his own writing, Blanchot asks, “Why yet another book, where a seismic shuddering—one of the forms of the disaster—lays waste to it? Because the order of the book is required by what the book does not contain...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2022) 52 (1): 93–117.
Published: 01 January 2022
... by assuming unexpected rhetorical postures. . . . Refusing the vatic license to place past, present, and future in a linear relation, nescience gives itself up to a temporal disorder that is the special effect of calamities and their form. —Anahid Nersessian Chaucer's Knight tells a story about...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2002) 32 (3): 519–542.
Published: 01 September 2002
...—and in the substance of the mirror itself. Sixteenth-century writers maintained that knowledge of the divine was accessible to human reason through nature. A more immedi- ate perception of the divine was possible through revelation, and the mirror stood for revelation as well; at least in the cabalistic...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2020) 50 (3): 633–657.
Published: 01 September 2020
... and hopes for a changed approach to the fomenting confessional tensions of early seventeenth- century Europe. Based on Foxe s Acts and Monuments (first English edition, 1563), these Jacobean elect nation plays interpret temporal historical events in terms of their Smith- Cronin / Apocalyptic Chivalry 635...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2022) 52 (1): 69–92.
Published: 01 January 2022
... understanding and what it means to live in the face of a future that we cannot know—the catastrophe of temporal life. This metaphysical grappling takes place within the tightly wrought structure of the Old English metrical line, asserting a modicum of human control—poetic form—in an uncertain and anxiety...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2007) 37 (3): 493–510.
Published: 01 September 2007
... critics have largely abandoned the rubric of “Golden Age” for the more historicist “early modernity,” the 1492 boundary has not shifted perceptibly. If anything, the change in terminology has made it seem even more crucial: as Tzvetan Todo- rov has argued, 1492 has always offered an irresistible...