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social norms

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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2010) 40 (2): 325–346.
Published: 01 May 2010
...Douglas Biow Beards, both real and fake, acquire a special status in Giordano Bruno's Candelaio as symbolically charged objects that reveal not only much about the characters and their functions within the play, but also much about social norms and expectations regarding the performance of male...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2019) 49 (3): 563–588.
Published: 01 September 2019
... and normative authority of nature, but also in complex dialogue with contemporary pastoral theory and moral philosophy (which rejected wet-nursing), as well as contemporary social practices, values, and beliefs. Physicians recognized maternal breastfeeding as the best and most natural option because...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2022) 52 (1): 69–92.
Published: 01 January 2022
.... Copyright © 2022 by Duke University Press 2022 Old English Fortunes of Men human fate death and consolation alliterative long line social norms The first half of the Old English poem known as The Fortunes of Men , sometimes called The Fates of Men or The Fates of Mortals , offers...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2020) 50 (2): 199–231.
Published: 01 May 2020
... characterizes this cultural norm, the Romans expected of one another a high degree of behavioral refinement. Roman decorum, the understanding of what befits oneself, what is appropri- ate to oneself in a given social position, was the means of defining and real- izing oneself.23 It is characteristic of shame...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2006) 36 (3): 619–642.
Published: 01 September 2006
... observed accounts of bee sociality in the service of maintaining the power of the bee “polity” to analogize, and thereby to authorize, prevailing norms such as gender hierarchy in govern- ment, the superior usefulness of male labor, or the chastity and monogamy of women. The metaphorical aptitude...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2013) 43 (2): 303–334.
Published: 01 May 2013
... that performative identities are normatively scripted — socially as well as materially — the liberatory promise of gender’s performativity captures a self-­making fantasy.8 By con- Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies 43:2, Spring 2013 DOI 10.1215/108296362081987  © 2013...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2012) 42 (3): 597–614.
Published: 01 September 2012
... as prompting the need for stricter policy. Unnamed nuns across Europe were violating social and religious norms, engaging in dangerous conduct as they “roved about” European cities and hence purportedly necessitating tighter regulation and stronger male oversight of their communities.11 However...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2003) 33 (3): 471–492.
Published: 01 September 2003
... and the Byzantine sociology of knowledge, self-perpetuating constructions that helped to formulate thought and underpin social norms. 89 484Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies / 33.3 / 2003 Notes 1Hence one is grateful for the welcome collection edited by S. Elm, E. Rébillard...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2009) 39 (2): 407–432.
Published: 01 May 2009
... women make the best of con- temporary property and other power relations in their own self-interest, but rather those that reject oppressive social norms altogether, we might move closer to understanding how early modern women could progressively imag- ine a more generally humane social order...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2016) 46 (3): 603–628.
Published: 01 September 2016
... to moral reflection not only disaggregates right from good, but in so doing hastens the shift from virtue ethics to a consequentialist model of social relations; remedial (legal) action has effectively shorn civic reason of all normative (a priori) constraints and, also, of all...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2009) 39 (3): 597–617.
Published: 01 September 2009
... of articles of clothing or accessories to different social groups. While general admonitions to moderation accompanied by types of exceptions or exemptions characterize the norms of the second half of the thirteenth and the fourteenth century, in the fifteenth century we find a partitioning of society...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2000) 30 (1): 63–100.
Published: 01 January 2000
... members of the dyad. The aldermen’s routine use of gender- specific dyadic formulas reveals that the social and economic participation of women in Douai was perceived not as exceptional or “marked,” but rather as the norm, virtually on par with that of males. And while...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2004) 34 (1): 17–40.
Published: 01 January 2004
... by such an exchange; the relative roles of the men and women involved—all these aspects are central to social structure. They all, ultimately, require the gendering of human actors, and gender identities, in the end, are defined in relation to the relative ability to take an active part in normative heterosexual...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2003) 33 (3): 419–435.
Published: 01 September 2003
... ceased to function normatively as a measure of religious status. Although, as Elizabeth Clark has pointed out, “gender-bending” was a feature of Christian portrayals of ascetic heroes from early on, Thecla being a notable example, still the gender that was “bent” was typically female rather than...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2021) 51 (3): 387–395.
Published: 01 September 2021
... When the field of performance studies first emerged, it borrowed from older disciplines, like the social anthropology of Victor Turner and speech act theory of J. L. Austin, to propose something entirely new—that scholars decenter the written word and focus instead on the embodied actions that also...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2004) 34 (1): 41–64.
Published: 01 January 2004
... for women’s status, with the exception of aristocratic women, appear to have been negative.5 Scholars agree that in terms of gender arrangements, a war- based social order tends to devalue femininity and male effeminacy.6 The result is a decline in the esteem of women and scorn for receptive (i.e., “fem...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2003) 33 (2): 281–309.
Published: 01 May 2003
... The Reverend Dodgson’s imagery of bodily trans- formation here captures something of the genuine strangeness of belief in transubstantiation at least when, as in the later Middle Ages, it is socially normative, a major criterion of orthodoxy and therefore compulsory. The Body of Christ is the sum...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2022) 52 (3): 567–591.
Published: 01 September 2022
... “ecosociability,” the stance reached by wisdom traditions around the world that intuit the “entwinements of natural, human, and spirit realms, and that identify the good with what preserves, achieves, or renews material and social human wellbeing.” 10 David Aers recovers a similar ethics of “kindness” in his...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2004) 34 (1): 173–196.
Published: 01 January 2004
... the woman he desires; but that failure presupposes Antiochus’s subversion of the law of his own fatherhood—to wit, that according to the “natural” order of things, he is to give his daughter away in marriage and so forge a primary social bond to another man. Apollonius’s heterosexual fail- ure may...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2000) 30 (3): 449–462.
Published: 01 September 2000
...- odization, the normativity of which has come under the scrutiny of critics such as Michel de Certeau, Homi Bhabha, and Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick.6 As early as 1974 de Certeau worried about the “ethnological” form (his empha- sis) of Foucault’s genealogy.7 By ethnological form he...