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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2013) 43 (1): 121–144.
Published: 01 January 2013
...Helga L. Duncan This essay examines Shakespeare’s representation of sacred space in As You Like It and argues that the play should be read as Shakespeare’s imaginative commentary on a changing culture of sacred spaces at the end of a century of religious reformation. Drawing on J. Z. Smith’s work...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2013) 43 (1): 25–48.
Published: 01 January 2013
...Bruce R. Smith Euclidean geometry instructs us to think of space in visual terms as points, lines, and shapes, but a more adventurous geometry would take into account the subjectivity of the perceiver. When we try out that approach on Shakespeare and his contemporaries, situating them within the...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2004) 34 (3): 523–548.
Published: 01 September 2004
...D. Vance Smith © by Duke University Press 2004 Marx and T. F. Tout: Household, City, and History at Manchester D. Vance Smith Princeton University...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2018) 48 (2): 227–260.
Published: 01 May 2018
...Nicole D. Smith A Christian Mannes Bileeve is a little-known Middle English commentary on the Apostles’ Creed that was read by women religious to learn ecclesiastical doctrine. It presents, in a unique way, the figure of the thinking heart to reconcile the gendered binaries of Latin and vernacular...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2003) 33 (2): 335–351.
Published: 01 May 2003
...Nigel Smith © by Duke University Press 2003 Elegy for a Grindletonian: Poetry and Heresy in Northern England, 1615–1640 Nigel Smith...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2009) 39 (1): 95–117.
Published: 01 January 2009
...Nigel Smith This article explores Edmund Gayton's Pleasant notes upon Don Quixot (1654), a sentence-by-sentence commentary on Thomas Shelton's 1612 and 1620 translation of Cervantes. Gayton's text partakes in the characteristics of a series of translations from the Spanish that involve some degree...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2010) 40 (3): 425–438.
Published: 01 September 2010
...David Aers; Nigel Smith This special issue is devoted to the English Reformations and current historiography. The title intentionally pluralizes the traditionally singular noun Reformation to signify a scope that includes both the early Reformation (through to 1547) and continuing senses of...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2005) 35 (1): 91–110.
Published: 01 January 2005
... Malycyous Sclaundererss were followed by seven further troll poems. A Lytell Treatyse Agaynst Sedicyous Personss by Thomas Smith is an attempt to separate out diff erent kinds and degrees of trolling. In particular, Smith tries to draw a distinction between true and false trolling. He tells his...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2013) 43 (3): 599–621.
Published: 01 September 2013
... theo- retical activity. According to Pamela Smith, “[T]echnē had nothing to do with certainty but instead was the lowly knowledge of how to make things or produce effects, practiced by animals, slaves, and craftspeople.”19 Artisans were not relegated to merely technical activities; rather, an...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2013) 43 (3): 679–681.
Published: 01 September 2013
... Crowns, 1603 – 1607  393 – 417 Sheerin, Brian The Substance of Shadows: Imagination and Credit Culture in Volpone  369 – 391 Sherman, Donovan Governing the Wolf: Soul and Space in The Merchant of Venice  99 – 120 Smith, Bruce R. Taking the Measure of Global Space  25 – 48 Weisser...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2009) 39 (1): 223–224.
Published: 01 January 2009
... / Number 3 / Fall 2010 Edited by David Aers and Nigel Smith This special issue is devoted to the English Reformations and current histo- riography. We intentionally pluralize the traditionally singular noun Refor- mation to signify a scope that includes both the early Reformation (through to 1547...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2009) 39 (1): 1–5.
Published: 01 January 2009
..., yet carefully expresses it in relation to the via rather than the palus. Taking as his point of departure the first English commentary on Don Quijote, published by Edmund Gayton in 1654, Nigel Smith illumi- nates Gayton’s practice of fusing his commentary with Cervantes’s narrative in...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2009) 39 (2): 455–457.
Published: 01 May 2009
... httpmedren.aas.duke.edu/jmems Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies 39:2, Spring 2009 DOI 10.1215/10829636-2008-029  © 2009 by Duke University Press English Reformations: Historiography, Theology, and Narrative Volume 40 / Number 3 / Fall 2010 Edited by David Aers and Nigel Smith...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2012) 42 (3): 635–655.
Published: 01 September 2012
... the Interregnum and Restoration largely remain silent about the significant roles played by royalist women in the quest to restore the monarchy. As Jason McElligot and David Smith have noted, “Until very recently one could have been forgiven for assuming that, apart from Queen Henrietta Maria...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2004) 34 (1): 17–40.
Published: 01 January 2004
... inevitably makes change appear imperceptible.7 To paraphrase Julia Smith’s learned and elegantly expressed overview, did women experience the trans- formation of the Roman world? On that scale, no. If it did take five hun- dred years to transform the Roman world, then the pace of change must have been so...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2011) 41 (2): 435–455.
Published: 01 May 2011
.... Grand Rapids, Mich.: William B. Eerdmans Publishing, 2010. $95.00. Davis, G. R. C. Medieval Cartularies of Great Britain and Ireland. Revised by Claire Breay, Julian Harrison, and David M. Smith. London: British Library, 2010. xxx, 331 pp.; 9 illus. $75.00. DeGregorio, Scott, ed. The Cambridge...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2013) 43 (3): 473–485.
Published: 01 September 2013
... innovations another form of knowledge altogether. Linked with manual labor, as the term “handicraft” suggests, artisan knowl- edge remained aligned with lower social status throughout the period. While artisans were often conceived of as limited, practical-­minded people, historian Pamela H. Smith...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2015) 45 (2): 343–365.
Published: 01 May 2015
... riot and rebellion were to be eschewed in favor of governmental intervention on behalf of the poor. Crowley and Latimer’s critique of private profit was at odds with the views of another mid-­Tudor observer, Sir Thomas Smith, who argued that profit should be the basis for social harmony...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2016) 46 (1): 167–188.
Published: 01 January 2016
... pieces” by distentio animi. In The Theory of Moral Sentiments, Enlightenment philosopher Adam Smith calls this prac- tice of conceptual self-­projection “sympathetic imagination”: By the imagination we place ourselves in his situation, we con- ceive ourselves enduring all the same...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2018) 48 (1): 11–40.
Published: 01 January 2018
... essential conformity to an old-­world system. So, John Smith’s remarkable map of New England (London, 1616) offers a bizarre medley of (even to modern English or Scottish eyes) familiar names, but geographically redistributed according to no observable pattern or plan. As we move from south to north...