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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2004) 34 (3): 577–610.
Published: 01 September 2004
...Andrew Cole © by Duke University Press 2004 What Hegel’s Master/Slave Dialectic Really Means Andrew Cole University of Georgia...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2007) 37 (1): 57–74.
Published: 01 January 2007
...Robert Davis Duke University Press 2007 a The Geography of Slaving in the Early Modern Mediterranean, 1500 – 1800 Robert Davis...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2014) 44 (2): 321–344.
Published: 01 May 2014
... also represents her as a captive of erotic desire, a slave of unruly passion, and a prisoner of the law. This multifaceted vision of royal incarceration is animated by a heterogeneous tradition of ideological writing in medieval and early modern England and Scotland. Three strands of a rich mosaic of...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2004) 34 (1): 65–94.
Published: 01 January 2004
... maintained separate identities.4 But whether or not the Muslim army arrived with wives and daugh- ters, it is a fact that throughout history women have been objects of exchange. In Islam, as in Byzantium and ancient Rome (and even parts of the modern world), women were bought and sold as slaves...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2003) 33 (3): 403–417.
Published: 01 September 2003
... sign, a stigma. But what might this imply? Christianity and the history of the tattoo The history of tattooing is by now not altogether uncharted territory. The ancient Greeks and Romans used tattooing to mark the bodies of criminals and slaves, that is, to inscribe the violence of punishment or...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2006) 36 (2): 223–261.
Published: 01 May 2006
... theorists such as Jean Bodin, it became key to theorizing the relation of sovereignty and slavery in domestic and international law. In this new role the historiographical condensation of a “feudal” past both facilitated the transference of the “problem of slavery” from the contemporary slave trade...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2002) 32 (3): 433–468.
Published: 01 September 2002
... adopted. (94) For Hegel, the people of the “the land of childhood” are excluded from human history because they are already slaves to the merely material world, slaves to their barbarous fetishism. For Enlightenment thinkers and their nineteenth-century succes- sors, the fetish was the...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2011) 41 (3): 515–544.
Published: 01 September 2011
... social inferiors even justifies the purchase of Christian slaves, something that was routinely prohibited by canon law. At the Genoese slave market of Kaffa, Tafur pur- chases two women and a man, whose children he claims to “possess” in Cordova at the time he writes his narrative (162). According...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2017) 47 (1): 7–52.
Published: 01 January 2017
... very dry and impersonal. It lacks subjectivity. Today microhistories are turning up in global and comparative history — I am reading John Sensbach’s Rebecca’s Revival about an African-Caribbean missionary and the Moravian Pietists who mediated between the plantation class and slaves.17 Global...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2007) 37 (1): 1–7.
Published: 01 January 2007
... those categories, and this is the focus of the essay by Robert Davis. Particularly notable in such slaving activity is the manipulation of religious difference, which pro- vided moral justification that would not otherwise be available. Malta played an active role in the slave trade, merely one...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2004) 34 (3): 463–472.
Published: 01 September 2004
..., a manifold gradation of social rank. In ancient Rome we have patri- cians, knights, plebeians, slaves; in the Middle Ages, feudal lords, vassals, guild-masters, journeymen, apprentices, serfs; in almost all of these classes, again, subordinate gradations...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2017) 47 (1): 53–73.
Published: 01 January 2017
...- urrect our dead “authors,” and microhistory, by its habits, then fleshes out their lives. Now, agency seldom turns up when we ponder the powerful. Char- lemagne’s agency? Why ever ask! Rather, we use the term with underlings, with the hampered and the hobbled: the agency of women, of slaves...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2001) 31 (1): 57–78.
Published: 01 January 2001
... sign of an interior spiritual state that calls upon itself God’s retribution. The biblical text states that every Egyptian household, from the slave to the elite, will mourn their firstborn because of Pharaoh’s hardened heart. A need to explain or...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2009) 39 (1): 183–200.
Published: 01 January 2009
... and imported massive numbers of African slaves to work them.36 With Jamaica’s capture England came into possession of cacao groves, also called cacao walks, their first direct source of the product. The relay of chocolate knowledge to England was no longer transmitted by rec- onciled...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2007) 37 (1): 163–195.
Published: 01 January 2007
..., grain from Sicily and Sardinia, butter from Minorca, salt from Ibiza, and [most intriguingly for our purposes] large numbers of Mus- lim slaves.24 What is striking in Alatiel’s adventure, then, is less the place where she comes ashore than the rude means of her...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2007) 37 (1): 75–95.
Published: 01 January 2007
... Bosphorus, from Malta to Tunis, the exchange of commodities took place alongside the widespread practice of piracy and slave-trading. Piracy was not always a criminal activity, however; it was authorized and sponsored by various state authorities as a legitimate activity carried out against desig...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2007) 37 (3): 595–620.
Published: 01 September 2007
... scholarship privileged cross-cultural contact in the Americas, impervious to the move- ment of “the slaving Mediterranean” into “the Black Atlantic” (to borrow an evocative image from David Wallace).17 But the slaving Mediterranean also takes us to Africa and Asia, with their even older histories of...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2004) 34 (1): 173–196.
Published: 01 January 2004
... functionary of the bathhouse that the establishment is open to all— citi- zens, strangers, freeborn and slave (“cives, peregrini, ingenui, servi,” to which the Old English adds noble and commoner, “ædele and unædele corresponds to the well-documented public benefaction of free bathing.34 The mingling of...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2005) 35 (2): 429–452.
Published: 01 May 2005
... the Disciplines 443 Fox, Peter. An Introduction to Anglo-Saxon Kingship. Hockwold-cum- Wilton, Norfolk: Anglo-Saxon Books,  pp. Paper Gallay, Alan. Th e Indian Slave Trade: Th e Rise of the English Empire in the American South, New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, xviii, pp...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2001) 31 (1): 165–174.
Published: 01 January 2001
... wrote, “Those who are far removed from acquiring virtues are slaves by nature like the Turks and [N]egroes and in general people living in an unfavorable climate.” Does the paradoxical character of the formula- tion—“by nature” yet perhaps caused by living “in an...