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shylock

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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2010) 40 (1): 89–117.
Published: 01 January 2010
... confessional divide, in a deep suspicion of, as well as a longing for, the possibilities of satisfacere , making or feeling “enough” in matters of spiritual restitution. In The Merchant of Venice , this fraught understanding of penitential experience takes special shape around the Jew Shylock. Shylock's...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2013) 43 (1): 99–120.
Published: 01 January 2013
... with a reading of the play as an externalization of the internal spacing by which the soul is kept at bay. Shylock, by refusing to engage in acts of signification or translation — in direct opposition to his Christian antagonists — provides a figuration of the soul, and his expulsion allows the play to...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2010) 40 (1): 1–5.
Published: 01 January 2010
... Merchant of Venice explores the play’s “disavowed desire for an exact and now unavailable sys- tem of reparation.” Shylock’s bond stands for the most uncompromising, literal form of that penitential calculation. Here a cultural analysis of satis- faction and its discontents is brought to bear in a...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2013) 43 (1): 145–172.
Published: 01 January 2013
... and spectatorship, the noble chair supports, frames, and projects a sense of dignity through its bodily architecture. Capulet will become Brabantio, and Shylock, and even- tually Lear, all of them “men with chairs,” patriarchs suffering the fragility of their dignity in a world that belongs to...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2003) 33 (2): 281–309.
Published: 01 May 2003
... as converting volun- tarily rather than by force. One might compare the ending of The Merchant of Venice, where Shylock loses his goods and is forcibly converted, with Gra- ziano protesting that even that is too good for him: 288 Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies / 33.2 / 2003...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2010) 40 (2): 373–400.
Published: 01 May 2010
... first argument is reminiscent of Shylock’s shocking declaration that he cannot refrain from killing Antonio because, as he says, “I have sworn an oath that I will have my bond” (Merchant of Venice 3.3.5), and, in a more comic vein, Toby Belch’s report to Cesario that Sir Andrew “will fight you...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2013) 43 (1): 71–98.
Published: 01 January 2013
... assists her hero in winning his suit. Medea helped Jason obtain the golden fleece through her sorcery; Portia helps Bassanio and Antonio win their suit against Shylock through a similar verbal sorcery. (Some critics even argue that Portia helps Bassanio choose the correct casket through the song...