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shame as a virtue

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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2020) 50 (2): 199–231.
Published: 01 May 2020
... and is reflected in modern research literature as well.4 In the Nicomachean Ethics, Aristotle famously writes that shame should not 200 Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies / 50.2 / 2020 be described as a virtue, for it is more like a feeling than a disposition. It is a kind of fear of dishonor...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2003) 33 (3): 387–402.
Published: 01 September 2003
...). As actress and as monk, Pelagia serves to broadcast a moral to men: if a woman exhibits such care and devotion, how much more should a man? In monastic literature the real women that instruct male monks by shaming them with their virtue inhabit the same world as the real women who tempt male...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2020) 50 (2): 403–429.
Published: 01 May 2020
... his haunting and continual whispering . . . in the ear make for a vexed moral topography for the virtue of humility that the Valley Shame inhabits would purport to offer training in. Apparently acquiring genuine humility means that Faithful must flee this bold villain and his counterfeit authority...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2011) 41 (2): 393–416.
Published: 01 May 2011
... works in part because the number and complexity of his female characters featured in it are unique.2 These include a seductive noblewoman, Dame Sensualitie, who functions as a devious instrument of Rome and the Scottish clergy; two allegorical virtues who also arrive from abroad, Veritie...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2010) 40 (1): 149–172.
Published: 01 January 2010
... the language of Catho- 160  Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies / 40.1 / 2010 lic reform, not the demonizing terminology of Protestant polemic: “Holy men I thought ye, / Upon my soul, two reverend cardinal virtues —  / But cardinal sins and hollow hearts I fear ye. / Mend ’em, for shame, my...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2014) 44 (1): 17–43.
Published: 01 January 2014
... conscious of itself, kindled his strength” Justice / “Shameless”  27 (5.455); he rallies suddenly and nearly kills Dares. The shame “kindles” his strength, sets fire to it — the familiar Virgilian image of passion — but it is “conscia virtus,” power...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2003) 33 (3): 403–417.
Published: 01 September 2003
... The tattoo is, then, a 404Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies / 33.3 / 2003 sign of shame and subjugation, whereby the body is marked by another and also marked as “other. ” Y et here as elsewhere—most notably in the dis- course of martyrdom and the Žgure of the cruciŽed Christ...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2016) 46 (2): 405–432.
Published: 01 May 2016
... plea, and, in many circumstances, an intercessor can realize my desire precisely because of a surplus quality, virtue, or skill — some entity that is deficient within myself. Thus the intercessor and intercessee enact a curiously ambiguous series of extensions of self: my intercessor is at once...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2013) 43 (1): 145–172.
Published: 01 January 2013
... dependencies through a signifying arsenal that cultivates linguis- tic and musical performances alongside a diverse object world composed of special foods, fibers, and tools. The emotional palette of hospitality includes not only anticipation, joy, and good cheer, but also fear, shame, and bore- dom. We...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2012) 42 (1): 157–179.
Published: 01 January 2012
...Markku Peltonen This article examines the role and place of virtues in early modern English grammar schools (ca. 1558 – 1640). It argues that schoolboys were exposed to the questions of moral philosophy and virtues throughout their time in the grammar school. From their elementary classes in Latin...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2004) 34 (1): 197–224.
Published: 01 January 2004
... discussion of women’s virtues had long been de rigueur. By contrast, Yuan texts on faithful women over- whelmingly took the form of poetry, or biographical prefaces to volumes of collected poems. To be sure, the genre of poetry collections was itself estab- lished well before the Yuan—for centuries, men...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2015) 45 (2): 395–418.
Published: 01 May 2015
... and shame.”51 In Aristotle’s ethical and political theory there is no room for such a distinction. Aristotle’s account of temperance describes a virtue better integrated in the life of an actual polis than Plato’s. Genuine virtue can be at home in actual poleis because the practices of actual...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2009) 39 (3): 511–544.
Published: 01 September 2009
... that they were more particular about luxurious clothing than rare virtue. . . . One can see that many people [today] are honored for the quantity and sumptuousness of their dress and yet are empty of virtue and sound conscience. (Recueil, 30) He goes on to cite the New Testament...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2020) 50 (1): 33–52.
Published: 01 January 2020
... in the court, deploying a number of the conventions of female complaint that were to become ubiquitous in the 1590s in order to participate in the construction of the reputations of the figures involved.29 The female speaker is represented as deserving and constant, making an effective case for her virtues...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2020) 50 (2): 431–453.
Published: 01 May 2020
... that confronts the professed glory of commanders with allegations of shameful abuse.13 Indeed, the bal- lad s title alone addressing men who think to advance their decaying for- tunes by navigation aims to warn commoners away from seafaring s sup- posed promises of wealth and promotion. To labor...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2012) 42 (1): 83–105.
Published: 01 January 2012
... In the tradition of the remedial virtues, envy was contrasted with charity, itself described in terms that emphasize compassion and love of one’s neighbor.7 Envy is thus a vice that is conditioned by one’s emotional disposition toward others, leading to actions that comprise the variously ennumerated...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2014) 44 (1): 69–94.
Published: 01 January 2014
... case Shuger / Laudian Feminism and Little Gidding  73 against literature; more specifically, against the chivalric romance. The ses- sion itself concerned patience, understood as a central Christian virtue. John first raises the issue, noting that “Ariosto...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2020) 50 (3): 609–631.
Published: 01 September 2020
..., and it seems to refer less to an abstract virtue than to a concrete manifestation of sincerity: trustworthiness. The latter quality reemerges in Wotton s second aphorism, this time focusing on speech rather than speaker. Wotton points at a fundamental ethical and pragmatic tenet of diplomacy: 610 Journal...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2021) 51 (3): 397–429.
Published: 01 September 2021
... truye: que les pourceaux le compeirent.” 50 Barber, 84–86; see also Phillips, “Pig in Medieval Iconography,” in Pigs and Humans , 365. Defamatory pictures sought to shame debtors or Jews by showing them suckling from sows or touching their anuses (Phillips, 366–67). 49 Richard Barber...
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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2010) 40 (1): 65–88.
Published: 01 January 2010
... that shame involves: hiding and seeking, from this point of view, can be associated with the play’s relentless impulse to strip its victims bare and expose them to a pitilessly shaming gaze.40 But it is striking how the language of hiding and seeking also responds to the actor’s situation...