1-10 of 10 Search Results for

scipio

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
×Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2016) 46 (1): 7–31.
Published: 01 January 2016
... Commentary on the Dream of Scipio echoes anatomical writings on the prepuce in order to amplify the patristic figure into a fuller conceit. These examples lay the groundwork for imagining a poetics of the prepuce. © 2016 by Duke University Press 2016 anatomical language foreskin and circumcision...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2006) 36 (3): 493–516.
Published: 01 September 2006
.... My own venture into utopia before Utopia begins with an extremely influential medieval text, Macrobius’s Commentary on the Dream of Scipio. Taking Bloch for an inspiration, if not a model, I am less interested in textual moments or representations that prefigure More’s Utopia and more...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2005) 35 (3): 489–508.
Published: 01 September 2005
... the second chapter of the Tri- umph of Cupid. Both these rewritings, or at least recollections, of the Aeneid off er a reprise of Virgil’s work by laying a more recent amatory encounter, 492 Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies / 35.3 / 2005 between Scipio’s North African general...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2005) 35 (3): 467–488.
Published: 01 September 2005
... course, diff erentiat- ing him radically from Dante as epic poet. In this context, the actual scene of authorization by genealogy is Africa The immediate setting is a prophetic dream vision that Ennius recounts to Scipio as the hero and his army return by sea to Rome, after defeating...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2003) 33 (3): 517–536.
Published: 01 September 2003
... citizens ( suos cives).36 More crucially, Damasus’ martyrs reveal themselves as exemplars of deeply embedded notions of manly excellence traceable from the epitaphs of the republican-age tomb of the Scipios, through the elogia of the forum of Augustus, to the eulogistic epigrams composed by Damasus...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2005) 35 (3): 457–466.
Published: 01 September 2005
... both Virgil and Ovid’s narra- tive of Dido for his own needs, Petrarch ends the Africa with the triumph of the Aeneas/Scipio fi gure, as Virgil would have it. Fidelity to imperial ambi- tions requires discipline, Simpson shows, and thus erotic desire, as embodied by the Ovidian Cupid, in the end...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2000) 30 (3): 431–448.
Published: 01 September 2000
... finds the voice to speak as citizen laureate of a colonized Rome. Again in Africa, he has Lucius Scipio 436 Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies / 30.3 / 2000 JMEMS30.3-01.Intro 9/1/00 5:03 PM Page 437 predict the future of Rome, a prediction broken off...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2014) 44 (1): 187–213.
Published: 01 January 2014
...-­meanings are not private, that they are in some sense communal and thus may be, as we will see in examples from early modern Huronia and Iroquoia, binding. Macrobius’s Commentary on the Dream of Scipio — which liter- ary dream concludes Cicero’s classic work of Roman political science, De...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2009) 39 (3): 511–544.
Published: 01 September 2009
... adopted throughout all Italy: 522  Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies / 39.3 / 2009 Figure 4. “Signori di Castella.” Vecellio, Degli habiti antichi (1590), fol. 50r. Jones / Vecellio’s Costume Books  523 Signor Scipio Costanzo, a...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2014) 44 (3): 617–643.
Published: 01 September 2014
... translatio imperii. Orosius describes the arrival of the military leader Publius Scipio, who sought to destroy Carthage completely. When he had fought there for six continuous days and nights, the depths of despair brought the Carthaginians to surrender. They asked only that...