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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2010) 40 (1): 65–88.
Published: 01 January 2010
... playerly routines register the actor's dramatic situation on stage and how these scenes are deployed for the poetic and dramatic ends of the works. These deployments register a distinctly premodern approach to the energies of the theatrical occasion, an approach that is submerged by later developments...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2013) 43 (1): 145–172.
Published: 01 January 2013
...Julia Reinhard Lupton This essay uses the concept of affordances, borrowed from design theory and environmental psychology, in order to map the use of space in act 1, scene 5 of Romeo and Juliet . Hospitality provides a socio-symbolic script for objects and persons in action that crosses theatrical...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2013) 43 (2): 303–334.
Published: 01 May 2013
... form of excellence, an ethics of embodied endurance strong enough to withstand repeated acts of injustice. Like medieval poets, Shakespeare returns to the scene of Cressida’s destruction in order to dramatize the cultural conditions that script her moral evacuation. Taking a long view of Cressida’s...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2013) 43 (2): 335–367.
Published: 01 May 2013
... necromantic books and liturgical books. It then proceeds to scenes in which Faustus draws on the efficacious language of sacraments, the doctrine of transubstantiation, as well as topoi like Eucharistic gazing and blood sacrifice. In this analysis, conventional oppositions such as parody and piety, medieval...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2014) 44 (2): 373–405.
Published: 01 May 2014
... that defined the wider mise-en-scène of visual experience there. On 15 November 1532, the the Inca ruler Atawallpa received a group of about twenty Spanish soldiers at a residential complex outside Cajamarca, Perú. When he first saw the Inca king, one soldier recalled, the native ruler was seated...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2013) 43 (1): 25–48.
Published: 01 January 2013
... historically specific terms.4 A specific scene from Henry IV, Part One, likely first acted in 1596 Smith / Taking the Measure of Global Space  27 or 1597, can help us get our bearings. The rebel faction are dividing up the country they hope to take over...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2013) 43 (1): 71–98.
Published: 01 January 2013
... “fresh insight.” For example, though Marks notes one episode of dramaturgical novelty in the confrontation between Hamlet and Gertrude that occurs in act 3, scene 4, he finds it ultimately unsatisfying: The interlude [director Michael] Grandage chooses for uncon- ventional...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2008) 38 (2): 229–252.
Published: 01 May 2008
... or paradise in key scenes of Corpus Christi cycles were often per- formed by goldsmiths (enacting what scholars identify as an “obvious” visual link between gold and kingly wealth), but just as often included assignments to the spicers and grocers guilds, revealing the ways in which scent...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2015) 45 (1): 159–195.
Published: 01 January 2015
... with the Erri family workshop to craft for the church altarpieces dedi- cated to four prominent Dominican saints: Dominic, Peter Martyr, Thomas Aquinas, and Vincent Ferrer. Each polyptych was to comprise a central fig- ure of the saint in question, accompanied by scenes from his life.2 While the...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2016) 46 (2): 289–314.
Published: 01 May 2016
... demons whose mischief was thought to cause deformities in birth.22 In the later Rawlinson rendering, while most of the torture scenes are excised, the saint’s prayers are not abbreviated, suggesting that the compiler valued this aspect of the legend above others. With its concern for both mother...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2001) 31 (1): 57–78.
Published: 01 January 2001
... children whose white mothers and black fathers mourn in despair and disbelief is a startling scene, one not com- monly associated with early medieval culture (see fig. 1).1 The illustration showing the Slaying of the Firstborn in the late-sixth-century Ashburnham...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2013) 43 (1): 1–24.
Published: 01 January 2013
... relations.”18 These concepts very quickly paint a picture of the working assumptions of theatrical representa- tion. Blocking, scene-­setting, vocal projection, and auditorium organization all contribute to, develop, and negotiate the “ever-­shifting social geometry of power and signification” that...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2006) 36 (3): 585–618.
Published: 01 September 2006
... the moment of humanity’s (literally vertical) fall into history. A state of perfection may be gestured toward, but what the map’s Garden scene enacts is transgression. In its typological geometry and orchard plenty (bespoken by fountain and fruit tree), Hereford’s Eden partakes in the...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2005) 35 (2): 385–428.
Published: 01 May 2005
.... When shee was thus miserably bound to his unmercifull liking, with whipps hee was about to torment her. . . . Th e seeming pleasure off ered to the reader by this narrative of Limena’s torture, as Helen Hackett has remarked, transforms a violent scene into a reading experience that...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2009) 39 (1): 161–181.
Published: 01 January 2009
... colonial context of The Rover surfaces in the first scene, in which Don Pedro tells his sister, Florinda, that she is to marry Don Vincentio, identified as an ancient suitor who has made a great fortune in the Indies. Florinda and her sister Hellena are of course horrified, especially since...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2013) 43 (3): 573–597.
Published: 01 September 2013
... between these two modes of produc- tion is registered in scene 14, when a servingman arrives at Eyre’s shop to buy a pair of shoes for an unnamed “gentlewoman” (whom the audience knows to be Jane). At the start of the scene, the servant appears lost amidst London’s urban sprawl, but is guided by...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2004) 34 (2): 345–372.
Published: 01 May 2004
..., spiritual possibilities. Several examples pertaining to the play’s “atmosphere” help to corroborate this point. In the night scene in which Antonio’s nose bleeds, Antonio remarks to Bosola, “I thinke the Divell, that rules i’th’aire, stands in your light” (2.1.89–90). Far from being merely a poetic...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2013) 43 (1): 49–70.
Published: 01 January 2013
... to imagine two compet- ing spaces on the stage: one is representational and the other is imaginative. Importantly, this speech opens a new act and a new scene, clearing the stage for a new representational space. While modern notions of scene and act divisions were not distinct in the 1590s...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2005) 35 (2): 349–384.
Published: 01 May 2005
... explains, in part, the prevalence of violent and punishing scenes in the commemorative art and dramas of wed- ding festivities Th e rapes of Lucretia, Griselda, Proserpina, Europa, and various others of Jupiter’s victims also make regular appearances in nup- tial celebrations. In addition, certain...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2008) 38 (1): 57–78.
Published: 01 January 2008
... literary scene. Yet Racine’s accession to literary fame through Andromaque was not uncontroversial. The play was fantastically successful, but it was attacked for its depiction of political power and for the liberties it took with the psy- chology of characters from classical epic and tragedy...