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rhyming couplet

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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2022) 52 (1): 147–173.
Published: 01 January 2022
... Marvell use the rhyming couplet, the genre's paratactic generative principle, to depict decision-making's growth as a botanical phenomenon. Together these formal features show how problem-solving stewardship grows mindlessly, impractically, and very much like a plant. In that respect, these poems hint...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2020) 50 (2): 377–402.
Published: 01 May 2020
... unto his own designs. (1.16 20) Men who attempt to contend with God s providence will find that they have fulfilled it nonetheless: Mankind / Alone rebels against his Maker s will, / Which, though opposing, he must yet fulfil (1.10 12). So too, the reader has no escape from the rhyming couplets...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2022) 52 (1): 1–16.
Published: 01 January 2022
... the accumulative aesthetics and discontinuities of catastrophic lists and descriptions. Still others focus on the affordances of rhyme. As Ryan Netzley points out in his essay, some of the forms of the seventeenth-century country house poems, including their paratactic couplets, emerge in response to specific...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2020) 50 (1): 115–137.
Published: 01 January 2020
...- ers to the Reader next to the italicized passage, It is a good work, if it be sprinkled with the bloud of Christ, and then regularly throughout The Church-porch, where it is applied to rhymed couplets and other phrases: A verse may finde him, who a sermon flies, / And turn delight into a sacri...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2016) 46 (2): 289–314.
Published: 01 May 2016
..., a fragment, is recast in tail-­rhyme, a form closely associated with Middle English romance; and Bodley 779 constitutes a variation of the legend belonging to the stanzaic tradition, not previously collected with the SEL (see appendix B). On the Continent and in England, Margaret was known...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2001) 31 (2): 283–312.
Published: 01 May 2001
...-and-take of these conjunctions coordinates with the rhetorical structure of the Spenserian stanza: The rhyming couplet formed by “That she of death was guiltie found by right, / Yet would not let iust vengeance on her light” suggests a moment of resolution, which...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2018) 48 (2): 365–385.
Published: 01 May 2018
... example, highlighting the vulnerability of physical memorials to both the wastage of time and human violence: Not marble, nor the gilded monuments Of princes, shall outlive this powerful rhyme; But you shall shine more bright in these contents Than unswept stone...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2003) 33 (2): 335–351.
Published: 01 May 2003
... is that the Spirit speaks within. In this respect, the poetry is a device for capturing such workings. And here Brereley appears to celebrate the limiting powers of a poetic measure (rhymed pentameter couplets), as opposed to “liberty of tongue,” which risks a greater expense of words for no greater return...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2022) 52 (3): 567–591.
Published: 01 September 2022
... and spiritual performance that marshals powerful fictions in response to real risk. As the others accept the hands of their partners in gestures formalized by rhyming couplets, they join a dance choreographed by Hymen: Peace, ho, I bar confusion, ’Tis I who must make conclusion Of these most strange...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2017) 47 (2): 221–253.
Published: 01 May 2017
..., to which Nought responds, “Non nobis, domine, non nobis, by Sent Deny! / The Devll may daunce in my purs for ony peny; / Yt ys as clen as a byrdys [bird’s] ars” (486 – 89) — that is, empty.40 At a loss: Money and words Mankind’s rhyming of the words bought and nought and Nought’s insistence...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2022) 52 (1): 41–67.
Published: 01 January 2022
..., 452. 40 Kay and Zeeman, 452; and see, in a different context, Ryan Netzley, “Managed Catastrophe: Problem-Solving and Rhyming Couplets in the Seventeenth-Century Country House Poem,” Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies 52, no. 1 (2022): 147–73. 41 Kay and Zeeman, “Versions...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2018) 48 (2): 227–260.
Published: 01 May 2018
... in prose form in all of A Chris- tian Mannes Bileeve’s surviving manuscript witnesses, the rhyme, meter, and imagery allow for an experience of a thinking heart that closes the gap between words and understanding. The lyric, characterized by Rosemary Woolf, conveys intimate tenderness and stirs...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2022) 52 (1): 119–145.
Published: 01 January 2022
... In this sense, this moment represents a negative version of the “anticlosural” listing that Ryan Netzley discusses in the English country house poem; see “Managed Catastrophe: Problem-Solving and Rhyming Couplets in the Seventeenth-Century Country House Poem,” Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies 52...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2014) 44 (3): 549–583.
Published: 01 September 2014
... Day — a date that must have seemed both poignant and prescient in retrospect — and “rewasht” in drowning. Montagu’s formal choice of two rhyming couplets produces a shifting chronology of the child’s life: Henry’s death is reported both before his christening and again afterward, as though...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2007) 37 (2): 335–371.
Published: 01 May 2007
... began furst the gentyll blod. (Gentleness, 495 – 98) The Plowman’s first couplet agitates historicist critics inclined to tame literary language by tracing it to its conventional sources, for the convention here is 352  Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies / 37.2 / 2007 peasant...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2012) 42 (1): 201–224.
Published: 01 January 2012
... as unfettered choice.25 Although quiescence is the prevailing mood of this poem — a mood set by the first line’s calm acceptance of the fact that “all things within this fading world hath end” and perpetuated by the regularity of the meter and the couplet rhymes — it quickens halfway through...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2022) 52 (3): 415–443.
Published: 01 September 2022
... in the first three lines, in which meter, syntax, and narrative are all disrupted. 41 Thus the measure of the opening tetrameter line is metrically interrupted by the staccato irruption of the two-stress couplet immediately following. The syntactic link across that metrical dissonance is correlatively...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2002) 32 (2): 375–398.
Published: 01 May 2002
... of Libel 377 tures, Baron Waldstein, who visited Woodstock in 1600, also records the presence of the couplet mentioned by Foxe. On textual grounds alone, the extent of both overlap and diver- gence across these accounts suggests that we are dealing with a concerted attempt to sustain...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2010) 40 (2): 347–371.
Published: 01 May 2010
... final line, “Good luk this new year, the olde yere is past” (1518), and yet neither is identified specifically. The implications of this deliber- ate suspension are drawn out by a strange Latin couplet that precedes the envoys, which Scattergood translates thus: “Do you wish your mind...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2001) 31 (3): 561–584.
Published: 01 September 2001
... that God will “let thy blessed be mine, / And sanctifie this to be thine” (17–18). The final couplet of “The Altar,” then, advertises the purpose for which the altar was constructed—it is a place where humans can reenact the sacrifice of God. But the subsequent poem, “The Sacrifice,” demonstrates...