1-20 of 138 Search Results for

representation of Greek Christianity

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2023) 53 (1): 25–54.
Published: 01 January 2023
...Anastasia Stylianou Early modern Anglo-Hellenic relations have received little scholarly attention; however, Greek Christianity had a significant influence on the English Reformations. This article analyzes sixteenth-century English textual contacts with, and constructions of, Greek Christianity...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2011) 41 (3): 515–544.
Published: 01 September 2011
... as it first appears. The facial hair that the emperor sees as so central to a knight’s honor is reg- istered by the Castilian knight’s countrymen as a failure to observe cultural distinction, not only between Castilian and Greek but perhaps also between Christian and Muslim. While the Greeks...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2003) 33 (3): 493–515.
Published: 01 September 2003
... gods of the Greeks and the Romans, or by the Word of the Christian God? Fourth and Žnally , who could lay claim to the true, divinely created universality of Greekness within the Roman oikoumene? In other words, who was the true heir of Greekness within Rome, and who could claim to represent true...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2023) 53 (1): 1–23.
Published: 01 January 2023
... Representations of Greek Christianity during the English Reformations,” to identify the segmentation and exploitation of particular moments within Eastern Christianity to either justify or challenge the Church of England's break with Rome as well as examining the contemporary Greek response to English...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2017) 47 (3): 609–615.
Published: 01 September 2017
... him engaging with these fundamental issues as well as with more specific problems of translation. In order to do so, he made heavy use of the writings of a num- ber of Continental scholars who had become experts in the study of Jew- ish, Christian, and postclassical pagan Greek literature...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2003) 33 (3): 403–417.
Published: 01 September 2003
..., a stigma. But what might this imply? Christianity and the history of the tattoo The history of tattooing is by now not altogether uncharted territory. The ancient Greeks and Romans used tattooing to mark the bodies of criminals and slaves, that is, to inscribe the violence of punishment or possession...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2009) 39 (2): 305–330.
Published: 01 May 2009
..., in the Greek translation of it, and in the Latin translations of the Greek and the Hebrew. They were stumbling among the notions of reference, both visual and linguistic representation as well as a nonlinguistic and probably nonvisual divine presence, that are only margin- ally less difficult...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2001) 31 (1): 57–78.
Published: 01 January 2001
... commentaries of this enigmatic poem are the basis of Greek and Latin exegesis that interpreted the Shulammite woman as the Church, the Bride of Christ.40 Rufinus translated this commentary in Sicily in about 410, and Jerome translated the two homilies in Rome in about 383...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2003) 33 (3): 387–402.
Published: 01 September 2003
.... 11 On one level our short anonymous apophthegma plays on the gen- der ambiguity of the Greek word parthenos (“virgin ”) and on the deŽnition of true virginity. Unlike the male body, the female body could provide evi- dence of whether a person “truly was a virgin,” and in the fourth...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2008) 38 (1): 57–78.
Published: 01 January 2008
... kinds of representation. He flatters himself as a good choice to represent the Greeks, and he flatters Pyrrhus by evoking his distinguished lineage as the son of Achilles.13 Orestes comes as a sign of the Greeks, just as Pyrrhus is a sign of the Achillean line. Unfortunately, however...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2001) 31 (1): 113–146.
Published: 01 January 2001
..., resulted from a sun so intense that it had long ago overheated and transformed the white skin of their ancestors.21 Greek myth described the Ethiopians as pious and therefore favored by the gods; Greek medical writing (the so-called Hippocratic corpus) insisted...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2012) 42 (1): 181–200.
Published: 01 January 2012
... Notre Dame, Indiana Near the end of John Milton’s brief epic, Paradise Regained, the Son of God emphatically dismisses Satan’s offer of the wisdom of classical Greek philosophers: Alas what can they teach, and not mislead; Ignorant of themselves, of God much more...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2001) 31 (1): 79–112.
Published: 01 January 2001
...- ern France.” It was the Greeks and Muslims who began using it as a general term for all westerners, but the westerners soon found it convenient to adopt this broader usage for themselves. Though by and large synonymous with “Latin Christian,” it was not identical...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2007) 37 (1): 9–55.
Published: 01 January 2007
.... Alexander the Great had “cut open the straits between Istanbul and the Mediterranean,” resulting in a radical diminution of the Black Sea. Further, according to “the histories of the Greeks,” Alexander had also cut a passage at Gibraltar by which the Mediterranean could then flow into the Atlan- tic...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2003) 33 (1): 23–45.
Published: 01 January 2003
... for a fifth-century Christian ascetic than a first- century rabbi. Likewise, place-names in the text are given by Gamaliel in the “local” dialect of Aramaic, translated for Lucianus’s benefit into Greek.43 When the bodies themselves are discovered in their respective coffins, an engraved marker...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2007) 37 (1): 163–195.
Published: 01 January 2007
... (exporting Greek slaves from the Morea). 64 Thus Smarr’s assertion that civilized behavior “lies in the land of the other, while Christians are full of treachery, murder, lust, and disregard for the institutions of the church” (“Non-Christian People,” ibid., 33, emphasis added) rests...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2021) 51 (2): 263–284.
Published: 01 May 2021
... impressions of his entire body. 12 But later, in a chapter titled “Ancient examples cited by various Greek and Latin authors that prove the use of images,” Paleotti reports that “Abgar, king of Edessa, sent a painter to make a portrait of the face of our Lord, who, upon seeing this pious desire, impressed...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2003) 33 (1): 143–177.
Published: 01 January 2003
... experience of nature. In his landmark essay “The Structuralist Activity,” Roland Barthes revisits Hegel’s historical fable on the persistence of human fascination with “the Natural in Nature” and a readily perceptible (though as yet unnamed) presence in the natural world.2 Hegel identifies the Greek...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2016) 46 (1): 141–165.
Published: 01 January 2016
... description of his integral force is backed up by the incident in which the sick woman touches Christ lightly in a crowd, thereby both gaining a cure and causing Christ to feel the touch, for he exclaims, “I perceive that power has gone out of me.” The key Greek word here for “power,” also translated...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2001) 31 (1): 1–38.
Published: 01 January 2001
... expression in erotic or at least gendered formulas. In the Greek Alexander romance, Queen Candace of Meroë writes to Alexander and enjoins (echoing Belcane in Parzival ), “Do not think the worse of us for the color of our skin. We are purer in soul than...