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reading as interpersonal engagement

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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2023) 53 (3): 519–543.
Published: 01 September 2023
... behind the words. For medieval readers, connecting with an author's thoughts mattered, above all, because they understood reading to be a form of interpersonal engagement. The text is not simply an impersonal artifact, good for stimulating certain sorts of responses, but it is an expression...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2021) 51 (3): 497–507.
Published: 01 September 2021
... culture in which the drama was articulated within an expected physical interdependence, in which the mnemonics of study, of reading, were already located within an anticipated interpersonal interaction. One could write letters as Hamlet does, or steal and forge one as he also does, but even letters seem...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2020) 50 (1): 75–94.
Published: 01 January 2020
... convents in exile were engaged in constant traffic beyond the convent wall through conversation, transla- tion, and other forms of textual, material, and interpersonal exchange. Such exchange often involved movement across the boundaries separating the sacred and the secular, national languages...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2020) 50 (3): 659–670.
Published: 01 September 2020
..., and, on occasion, refusing diplomatic gifts.4 The New Diplomatic History has reinvigorated the study of writers like Wyatt and Sidney by bringing their seemingly tangential diplomatic careers to the center of new readings of their literary corpus.5 It has also remapped and expanded our grasp of diplomatic space...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2013) 43 (1): 1–24.
Published: 01 January 2013
... might talk of an ideology or hegemony of space and place. The essay then specifically studies dramatic examinations of place and space (with close reading of several moments from Hamlet and King Lear ) to delineate the various ways in which spaces are occupied by actors and audience members...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2004) 34 (1): 41–64.
Published: 01 January 2004
... wish to place Hrotsvit of Gandersheim’s writings and identity as a female author. To that purpose, I offer a reading of her works across the three genres in which she wrote—legends, plays, and his- toriography.1 Among the chroniclers of his reign, Hrotsvit of Gandersheim (ca. 935–after 973...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2016) 46 (3): 513–543.
Published: 01 September 2016
... by the generally chari- table spirit with which readers have attempted to engage an author whose treatment of “pullulating pluralism” is from beginning to end one of con- temptuous dismissal (111). When reading his protests against a public life “riven by angry, uncivil rivals with incompatible views about...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2016) 46 (1): 167–188.
Published: 01 January 2016
... physical symptoms, suggests that the author anticipated the diffi- culties of sharing his idiosyncratic illness and sought unconventional ways to express it in the Devotions. Given how many critics acknowledge an unease that attends the experience of reading the Devotions, we might also infer...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2010) 40 (2): 249–272.
Published: 01 May 2010
..., and Henry and Philip were engaged in skirmishes in disputed parts of the Auvergne and Berry.6 By August both kings had made their way back north and, despite ongoing fighting on the borders of Normandy and the Ile de France, met near Gisors to discuss peace. Several versions of the story...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2015) 45 (1): 53–77.
Published: 01 January 2015
... all attest to the fact that nuns engaged in acts of self-­harm with some frequency. These narrative sources present certain challenges of their own and must be read critically in conjunction with other evidence. For instance, convent accounts such as necrologies, chronicles, and ricordanze...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2013) 43 (2): 369–391.
Published: 01 May 2013
... of commercial transaction, did introduce a layer of ano- nymity and competition into many realms of transaction. However, rather than dissolve the sense of interpersonal dependence, this economic shift also seems in many ways to have expanded it. To return to Malynes’s discus- sion of banks...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2009) 39 (3): 459–481.
Published: 01 September 2009
... into their trades and actively shaped consumer demands, archival sources have already revealed that “goods decreasingly served the purpose of ‘storing value’ because of the growing popularity of buying cheap materials.”28 In short, fashion relied heavily on interpersonal relationships between sellers...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2001) 31 (2): 251–282.
Published: 01 May 2001
... that “the hole mat- ter was opened to her grace,” who, when she “understoode that the Byble in Englishe should be delivered unto her by Truth . . . thanked the citie for that gift, and sayed that she would oftentimes reade over that booke” (26). Mul- caster adds...