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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2005) 35 (3): 663–680.
Published: 01 September 2005
...Massimo Ossi © by Duke University Press 2005 Monteverdi as Reader of Petrarch Massimo Ossi Indiana University Bloomington, Indiana Ever...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2017) 47 (3): 415–435.
Published: 01 September 2017
... during the period, a material history of reading intersects with a less material history of interpretation. Evidence from early bibles and their users of all sorts—known biblical scholars, literary figures, or anonymous readers—sheds light on how readers confronted the changing problems of interpretation...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2016) 46 (1): 167–188.
Published: 01 January 2016
...Jessica Tabak John Donne composed his Devotions upon Emergent Occasions (1624) to share a revelatory experience of illness with readers. Yet, in the book's final chapter, Donne himself indicates that bodily pain is nearly incommunicable. This raises a question: How can Donne hope to share his...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2017) 47 (2): 221–253.
Published: 01 May 2017
...Lisa H. Cooper London, British Library, MS Egerton 1995 is a well-known miscellany of the late Middle Ages, filled like others of its kind with practical and didactic texts meant to assist its readers in their attempts at social, economic, and spiritual self-improvement. But it also contains a...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2017) 47 (3): 561–586.
Published: 01 September 2017
..., printers, and readers scrambled to restore paratexts soon thereafter. Among the readers who marked up their bibles was Thomas Marwood, a later seventeenth-century tutor for a Catholic gentry family. Investigating how Marwood creatively imitated the scholastics' dense theological commentary and opposed...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2018) 48 (2): 301–340.
Published: 01 May 2018
..., would seem an unlikely source for reformed Elizabethan readers in which to recognize valuable religious lore. But, in fact, these readers go far beyond repudiating “papistical” errors to demonstrate both the past roots of their own reformed theologies and the continuing pastoral utilities of much of the...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2015) 45 (3): 557–571.
Published: 01 September 2015
... fragments in new contexts. The practice presents a tension between assigning the prophetic book agency over the fate of the reader and the reader actively mining (and interpreting) the text for knowledge to be extracted and applied to life. The sortes Virgilianae thus involves both phronetic reading and a...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2017) 47 (1): 53–73.
Published: 01 January 2017
... article posits five further traits of microhistory: its insistence on the dense connectedness of things; its professed ignorance or very partial knowledge; its invitation to the reader to share doubt; its bridled intimacy with the elusive past; its half-baffled engagement with story as device and...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2017) 47 (1): 75–119.
Published: 01 January 2017
... readers on a journey to reconstruct a military campaign to Hunia (Hungary) in 819, the reasons for that military venture, the nature of the army's travel, and the scribe's role and progress in making his book. But why was Ellenhart there at all and what did he choose to copy while on campaign? To answer...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2017) 47 (2): 255–277.
Published: 01 May 2017
... these genres were standard reading for fifteenth-century English readers ranging from gentry to royal families. Even if they were not knights, many in this audience saw themselves in knightly terms, making it useful to pair these texts to consider how knightly bodies were represented to such an audience...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2009) 39 (1): 183–200.
Published: 01 January 2009
... considerable time in the Spanish New World before returning to England, where his account of travels in Spanish America helped ease his repatriation and religious reintegration. Gage's attention to New World food, especially the confection and consumption of the Indian drink chocolate, provided English readers...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2017) 47 (3): 461–486.
Published: 01 September 2017
... many contain the full New Testament, others include only select books or even select chapters of scripture and combine those translations with exegetical, devotional, or pastoral texts. This article explores how producers and readers took apart and reassembled Wycliffite translations to open up varied...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2017) 47 (3): 487–516.
Published: 01 September 2017
... role in shaping the English reader. Two of its innovative paratextual features are of particular importance: the breaking down of chapters into enumerated verses, facilitating the easy extraction of individual passages, and the expanded use of annotations, animating and enabling the application of...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2017) 47 (3): 587–597.
Published: 01 September 2017
... of the Bible in English, however, the Cambridge manuscript indicates that privileged readers showed a readiness to adapt older manuscript copies of the text for their use. © 2017 by Duke University Press 2017...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2019) 49 (1): 7–31.
Published: 01 January 2019
... proves himself to be not only an able and fluent reader and interpreter of tragic theory and tragic practice, but also a savvy critic of the very idea of tragedy — a critic whose final commitment is more to Christian revelation than to any classical notion of tragic experience. The Monk’s massive and...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2019) 49 (2): 209–231.
Published: 01 May 2019
.... The argument deploys grammatical analysis to demonstrate the blurring of linear time in the text, which invites readers to think about the past in terms not only of what has been lost but also of what might be gained, or regained, in the future. This split perspective on history is shown to be...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2009) 39 (2): 305–330.
Published: 01 May 2009
... turned out to be easier than producing Bible readers. a Literacy after Iconoclasm in the English Reformation Ellen Spolsky Bar-Ilan University...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2009) 39 (2): 407–432.
Published: 01 May 2009
... second, the dark side of the “same” London for the poor. Proposing that London should be abundant for all its inhabitants through a redistribution of the city's wealth and pleasures, the “Wyll” situates the utopian city in a yet unrealized future that readers, as executors, are enjoined to realize...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2009) 39 (3): 545–570.
Published: 01 September 2009
...Andrea Denny-Brown A medieval and early modern “best seller,” William Durandus's monumental late-thirteenth-century liturgical treatise, Rationale Divinorum Officiorum , offered its readers a definitive, codified explanation for almost every aspect of church symbolism. A close look at its book...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2011) 41 (1): 137–171.
Published: 01 January 2011
... their customs and, in Vecellio's case, from an aesthetic focus on their clothing. In contrast, the De Brys' version of New Spain as presented in parts 3–5 of their America series launched a vivid, sensationalist assault on their readers' curiosity, playing to their fascination with the horrors of New...