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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2013) 43 (2): 219–245.
Published: 01 May 2013
...Matthew Milner Recent work in historical philosophy on the Aristotelian concept of qualities — that is, hot, cold, wet, and dry, the fundamental causal agents of the natural world — offers a moment to reconsider the connections between medicine, religion, and natural philosophy in late medieval...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2019) 49 (1): 169–191.
Published: 01 January 2019
... childe” strives to understand sin, guilt, and culpability within the constraints of humanity’s limited self- knowledge. Julian both works within and transcends established scriptural and penitential traditions of representing childhood, childlikeness, and the related quality of meekness, a key virtue in...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2012) 42 (3): 511–517.
Published: 01 September 2012
...Nancy Bradley Warren The very word monasticism brings to mind images of walls and enclosures, suggests qualities of isolation and separation. As recent work on both medieval and early modern monastic foundations has demonstrated, though, the convent wall was actually quite permeable. In this...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2013) 43 (3): 487–519.
Published: 01 September 2013
... that define the painter’s vocation and the potentially sublime qualities of their finished works. Scholarship has yet to acknowledge the sophistication and precocity with which the medieval novella tackled thorny philosophical questions about the materiality of painting. © 2013 by Duke University...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2014) 44 (3): 549–583.
Published: 01 September 2014
... washing liturgical vessels), and a painted wooden box containing a manuscript sheet, “Upon the Birth and death of his deere sonne.” Montagu’s commemorative program invests memorial artifacts with the qualities attributed to sacred objects and develops and defends a private idolatry in which secular...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2014) 44 (3): 617–643.
Published: 01 September 2014
...Suzanne Conklin Akbari The sharp divide between sacred and secular objects is ultimately an arbitrary one: sacrality is less a quality inherent in the object itself than a product of the way in which the object is seen. This is particularly evident in medieval universal histories, in which all...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2011) 41 (2): 457–458.
Published: 01 May 2011
... Medieval and Early Modern Edited by Nancy Bradley Warren Volume 42 / Number 3 / Fall 2012 The very word monasticism brings to mind images of walls and enclosures, suggests qualities of isolation and separation. As recent work on both medi- eval and early modern monastic foundations has demonstrated...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2013) 43 (3): 679–681.
Published: 01 September 2013
..., Shannon Stranger Artisans and the London Sanctuary of St. Martin le Grand in the Reign of Henry VIII  545 – 571 680  Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies / 43.3 / 2013 Milner, Matthew The Physics of Holy Oats: Vernacular Knowledge, Qualities, and Remedy in Fifteenth-Century England...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2008) 38 (1): 15–34.
Published: 01 January 2008
... histories of situations, duties, behaviors, and qualities of the “good ambas- sador,” but always within the tradition of the ethical institutio. This tradi- tion, which developed from the Renaissance on, drew both on the values of the nobility and the court and on a discourse of individual abilities and...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2010) 40 (3): 621–623.
Published: 01 September 2010
... enclosures, suggests qualities of isolation and separation. As recent work on both medi- eval and early modern monastic foundations has demonstrated, though, the convent wall was actually quite permeable. For this special issue, we seek essays that explore the ways in which monastic foundations are...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2011) 41 (1): 247–249.
Published: 01 January 2011
..., 2011 Monasticisms Medieval and Early Modern Edited by Nancy Bradley Warren Volume 42 / Number 3 / Fall 2012 The very word monasticism brings to mind images of walls and enclosures, suggests qualities of isolation and separation. As recent work on both medi- eval and early modern monastic...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2009) 39 (2): 283–303.
Published: 01 May 2009
... inadvertently, reflects a disregard and even a distaste for the form of the story as it is related in Middle English. Such comments reveal how the modern reception history of medieval English romance is biased by French romance’s appeal to those literary and cultural qualities that modern readers tend...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2008) 38 (3): 443–465.
Published: 01 September 2008
... of body, the Country disease.” To counter this geographical quality, the Irish have a remedy, “Usquebach,” “which binds the belly and drieth up moys- ture.”12 Moryson’s reference to the “Country disease” and to its “excellent remedy” suggests that he is relaying views of health that were...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2013) 43 (1): 99–120.
Published: 01 January 2013
... Pythagoras survives, his citation in early modern England could connote a variety of qualities, from anti-­Catholic sentiment to comic melancholia to — as with Gratiano’s words — phylogenetic blur- ring.7 Metempsychosis existed somewhere between mythos and possibility, a seemingly far-­fetched idea...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2004) 34 (3): 643–672.
Published: 01 September 2004
... because it appears directly on the surface of the object itself, in (for example) the coat’s most mundane empirical properties: the cut and quality of its cloth, its warmth, and so on. As a value, the coat is not a “mirror” for something else; rather it becomes what it had not been previous to...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2010) 40 (2): 223–247.
Published: 01 May 2010
... generations afterwards, in its making betrays unease, and the story of that making is only accessible through verbal delineation. A seri- ous analysis of these accounts, however, must consider not only the events they describe but also their emphatically literary qualities. This is evident in their...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2011) 41 (2): 317–343.
Published: 01 May 2011
.... One such exam- ple involves demonstrating how literary qualities that characterize specific women’s mystical texts are already in dialogue with literary traditions.5 Bar- bara Newman’s work on “la mystique courtoise” shows how, for example, Hadewijch’s songs use the Minnesang tradition to speak...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2014) 44 (3): 457–467.
Published: 01 September 2014
... medieval universal histories, Suzanne Akbari notes that “the sharp divide between sacred and nonsacred (or sacred and secular) often made by modern readers is, ultimately, an arbitrary one. Sacrality is as much a product of the way in which the object is seen as a quality inherent in the object...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2000) 30 (1): 1–4.
Published: 01 January 2000
... of Western notions of sexuality, creat- ing notions of secrecy and desire that together sculpted the contours for that quality of inner life which we in the West call subjectivity. Confession is said to have created, in Lochrie’s terms, “a site of privacy in the...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2013) 43 (3): 473–485.
Published: 01 September 2013
... members, the guild represented a primary avenue to economic sta- bility and civic visibility. The major economic functions of guilds are well known: regulating craft quality and establishing local monopolies over the sale of particular items. Farr notes, “The corporate guilds to which mas- ters...