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punishment

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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2005) 35 (2): 385–428.
Published: 01 May 2005
...Shannon Miller © by Duke University Press 2005 Textual Crimes and Punishment in Mary Wroth’s Urania Shannon Miller Temple University...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2015) 45 (1): 131–157.
Published: 01 January 2015
...Romedio Schmitz-Esser This essay looks at the practice of burning corpses in the Middle Ages. Much research has concentrated on the later medieval period; however, the punishment of burning and its specific motivations and rationales for crimes such as heresy, witchcraft, and magic go back to much...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2010) 40 (3): 559–592.
Published: 01 September 2010
... terms of the questions they provoked about the meaning of life and the nature of death, and about the divine economy of rewards and punishments. This essay places mortalist thinking in relation to competing historiographical narratives of Reformation and secularization in early modern England, paying...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2013) 43 (3): 545–571.
Published: 01 September 2013
... issues surrounding crime, mercy, and punishment that sanctuary inspired. © 2013 by Duke University Press 2013 a Stranger Artisans and the London Sanctuary of St. Martin le Grand in the...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2015) 45 (1): 7–52.
Published: 01 January 2015
...Nicholas Terpstra The theatrical capital punishments of the early modern period blurred distinctions between private and public and between object and subject in their treatment of the prisoner’s body. Where did these rituals originate? Italian confraternities devised distinctive forms of offering...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2001) 31 (3): 561–584.
Published: 01 September 2001
... punishment is the subject of the poem’s end, Friedman allows the cerebral art of memory to supplant the corporeal discipline the poem invokes.18 In “Goodfriday,” though, the speaker concludes not by recollecting in tranquility his Savior’s suffering but by asking that the suffering of his own...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2005) 35 (2): 245–288.
Published: 01 May 2005
... to comple- ment their resolute execution of physical punishments. Beginning with the Catholic Monarchs, the Castilian rulers tried to legitimate their authority over the nobility and the common people, invoking their dynastic rights and Isabel’s providential accession to the throne. Just as...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2011) 41 (1): 93–115.
Published: 01 January 2011
..., graphi- cally depicts English execution: The greatest and most gréeuous punishment vsed in England, for such as offend against the state, is drawing them from the prison to the place of execution vpon an hardle or sled, where they are hanged till they be halfe dead...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2016) 46 (1): 89–115.
Published: 01 January 2016
... allegories that abound in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries are populated by personifications of the psychodynamics of love, which tend toward forceful physical interaction with the first-­person lover-­narrator: they punish, assault, or imprison him; they console or heal him. In the fifteenth...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2003) 33 (2): 311–334.
Published: 01 May 2003
... Day an indulgence a pena et a culpa, a comprehensive par- don from both the punishment and guilt of sin. Simon objected on many grounds. For a start, there was no written evidence that the papacy had ever granted the indulgence in question. Furthermore, Simon was confident that the Holy See simply...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2001) 31 (2): 283–312.
Published: 01 May 2001
... punishments as traitors, though they were not apprehended with open armour or weapon.23 As far as the government was concerned, the religion of the Jesuits was just a cover for treason. The balladeer Thomas Deloney carries this sentiment to a popular...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2003) 33 (3): 403–417.
Published: 01 September 2003
... sign, a stigma. But what might this imply? Christianity and the history of the tattoo The history of tattooing is by now not altogether uncharted territory. The ancient Greeks and Romans used tattooing to mark the bodies of criminals and slaves, that is, to inscribe the violence of punishment or...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2000) 30 (1): 41–62.
Published: 01 January 2000
... not been aware of Hetzeldorfer’s womanhood. Both were banished ten miles from the city, a rather mild pun- ishment in light of Hetzeldorfer’s own punishment and one which was often later revoked. The city officials waited, however, until after Katherina Het...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2001) 31 (2): 349–378.
Published: 01 May 2001
... criticism is to read what appears to be a humane, enlightened, or even spiritualized dis- cipline as only a method of political control more effective than corporal punishment. Jonathan Dollimore’s well-known essay on Measure for Mea- sure classically...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2013) 43 (1): 49–70.
Published: 01 January 2013
...” (5.5.10 – 12). Despite the sodomitical punishments so heavily theorized that may or may not occur in 5.5, it seems pivotal that Matrevis concludes that Edward II’s mind, not his body, must be “assailed.”10 Therefore, Edward’s body is neither the central object of punishment nor the real locus of...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2009) 39 (1): 31–42.
Published: 01 January 2009
... spoliation by infidels, foreshadowed the destructive assaults upon the Church of God by heretics, whose triumphs were allowed by Providence as a punishment for wickedness.” For fugitive Catholics within Protestant England, this topos bore a special resonance: the persecuted Jesuits William Weston and...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2005) 35 (2): 349–384.
Published: 01 May 2005
... history. For example, until Ann MacNeil and Suzanne Cusick began to think through the implications of staging the story of Ariadne at a wedding, it was barely noted that the piece had a social context at all, much less that Ariadne was only one of a stream of punished and otherwise violated women...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2005) 35 (1): 111–120.
Published: 01 January 2005
...- tionary” texts. That, with respect, is an under-reading of the book. We need to distinguish between the unbending constraints on “revolutionary” texts (especially their commitment to the exiguous and punishing confi nes of the literal sense) and the actual currents of the texts themselves. Those...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2009) 39 (2): 257–281.
Published: 01 May 2009
..., good lorde, how might alle be wele for the gret harme that is come by sinne to thy creatures?” (29.2  –  3). In other words, she takes momentarily the side of the orthodox theology of sin and punishment which leads inevitably to the eschatology of eternal damnation. How can it be otherwise, she...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2007) 37 (1): 75–95.
Published: 01 January 2007
... Roman Catholic corruption and “misbelief” as the factors that had led to Chris- tian defeat and loss of territory. Turkish might was conventionally described as a “scourge of God” that punished Christians for their sins and heresies. Despite mutual recriminations, both Protestants and Roman...