1-20 of 56 Search Results for

public sculpture

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2020) 50 (2): 293–321.
Published: 01 May 2020
... that was often more available for public inspection than the act of execution that preceded it. Severed heads thus assumed the role of public sculpture: they were likened to and in dialogue with figural representations in stone that inhabited the civic landscape, and manipulated by their creators to speak...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2004) 34 (1): 95–146.
Published: 01 January 2004
... and the idea of Northumbrian identity in the eighth century, is intended as a contribution to that project. Modern scholarship of Anglo-Saxon stone sculpture can be said to have begun in 1927 with the publication of W. G. Collingwood’s Northumbrian Crosses of the Pre-Norman Age. Collingwood’s aim...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2016) 46 (2): 339–379.
Published: 01 May 2016
...Jennifer Nelson In 1529, Peter Dell the Elder (1490–1552) made a relief sculpture of the Resurrection for Duke Heinrich of Saxony. At this time, Heinrich was shifting toward his wife Katharina's Lutheranism despite his elder brother Georg's disapproval. The relief's disjunctive, nonillusionistic...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2012) 42 (3): 657–698.
Published: 01 September 2012
... relinquishing his sword blade- downward, in an emphatically pacifist gesture (see fig. On a third level, the portal — in addition to featuring a gen- tle allusion to baptism through the presence of John the Baptist on the trumeau — functions as a vision of the public Mass focused on its key sacra...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2009) 39 (2): 331–373.
Published: 01 May 2009
... consisted of more than sexual intromission or inhibiting anxiety, and visual metaphors presented manliness in ways that were often humorous, usually public, and always assertive. Duke University Press 2009 a Manliness and the Visual...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2016) 46 (1): 189–207.
Published: 01 January 2016
... and Stone Sculpture in Brussels. Dis- tinguished Contributions to the Study of the Arts in the Burgundian Neth- erlands, vol. 2. Turhnout, Belg.: Harvey Miller Publishers, 2013. 237 pp.; 181 color and black-­and-­white plates. eur 100.00. Fricke, Beate, and Urte Krass, eds. The Public in the Picture...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2003) 33 (3): 517–536.
Published: 01 September 2003
... summoned to respond Žrst. Eventually, of course, Rome would become comfortable as Roma chris- tiana. Across the Žfth century, Roman time would take on the rhythms of Christian time, the festivals of the saints and high holy days gradually replacing public games and rites keyed to the cults...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2014) 44 (3): 585–615.
Published: 01 September 2014
... of the Rood.”42 More of a transformation than a death, more of an ontological shift than a final end, to be hewn is a state of being that pervades the jubé of the chapel of Saint-­Fiacre. Multiple bodies exist within the sculpture, some scrambling, some hovering, some clinging —  each with its own...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2014) 44 (1): 45–68.
Published: 01 January 2014
... bliss in heaven from purgatory, “the most cruel of fires, quicker and more violent than any that one can imagine in this life.”2 That these figures are merely sculptures adorning a tomb is not a minor consideration. No prayers issue from their parted lips; no songs rise from their smooth throats...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2015) 45 (3): 573–594.
Published: 01 September 2015
..., as much recent schol- arship has emphasized, such a dialectical framework animated the period fascination with the archaeological remains of antiquity.1 In an era obsessed with the recuperation of ancient models, the ruinous state of Roman build- ings and sculpture was an unsettling reminder...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2018) 48 (1): 105–124.
Published: 01 January 2018
... when my fellow students and I had to content ourselves with a few internal parts being superficially displayed at one or two public dissections by the most ignorant barber”: so says Andreas Vesalius to Emperor Charles V in the pref- ace to De humani corporis fabrica (1543).1 This is more than...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2014) 44 (2): 281–320.
Published: 01 May 2014
... of con- struction at Beauvais, flying buttresses had long since become part of the visual landscape as a highly recognizable and identifiable element, attested to by their presence in numerous media including manuscript illumination, stained glass, microarchitecture, and sculpture (see fig. 12).33...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2014) 44 (2): 373–405.
Published: 01 May 2014
... bounded by rectangular or trapezoidal edges — are preserved in several Inca sculptural and spatial media beyond freestanding god-­ effigies: in architectural composition (doorways, windows, and niches), and in carved outcroppings and other altered landscape features. In certain instances...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2004) 34 (1): 65–94.
Published: 01 January 2004
... of the human form. Seen in this Islamic context with its more limited tradition of volumetric figural arts, the three-dimensional naturalism of the Roman sculpture— perhaps a Venus, as the name suggests—was surely “read” as non-Islamic and exotic, and its public display may have been intended as a reference...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2007) 37 (3): 621–644.
Published: 01 September 2007
... Books across the Disciplines” is a bibliographic resource that facili- tates a cross-disciplinary survey of recent publications. Its scope ranges from late antiquity to the seventeenth century. Coverage is comprehensive for the large majority of North American and British publishers. Other European...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2013) 43 (1): 191–212.
Published: 01 January 2013
... “New Books across the Disciplines” is a bibliographic resource that facili- tates a cross-­disciplinary survey of recent publications. Its scope ranges from late antiquity to the seventeenth century. Coverage is comprehensive for the large majority of North American and British publishers. Other...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2007) 37 (2): 419–443.
Published: 01 May 2007
... across the Disciplines” is a bibliographic resource that facili- tates a cross-disciplinary survey of recent publications. Its scope ranges from late antiquity to the seventeenth century. Coverage is comprehensive for the large majority of North American and British publishers. Other European...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2018) 48 (1): 153–182.
Published: 01 January 2018
...Amanda Taylor The sixteenth century witnessed the publication of landmark texts on anatomy and allegory: De humani corporis fabrica or On the Fabric of the Human Body by Andreas Vesalius in 1543 and The Faerie Queene by Edmund Spenser, published first in 1590. Each of these texts has received...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2016) 46 (3): 653–667.
Published: 01 September 2016
... “New Books across the Disciplines” is a bibliographic resource that facili- tates a cross-­disciplinary survey of recent publications. Its scope ranges from late antiquity to the seventeenth century. Coverage is comprehensive for the large majority of North American and British publishers. Other...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2016) 46 (1): 7–31.
Published: 01 January 2016
... was taboo. Circumcision offended Greek taste because it left the penis’s head uncovered. The ancients were often mer- rily nude in public, but they regarded an exposed penile tête as vulgar naked- ness.32 The corona glandis was snubbed due to its association with arousal. In uncircumcised men...