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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2002) 32 (1): 109–144.
Published: 01 January 2002
...Joëlle Rollo-Koster © by Duke University Press 2002 a From Prostitutes to Brides of Christ: The Avignonese Repenties in the Late Middle Ages Joëlle...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2017) 47 (1): 147–166.
Published: 01 January 2017
... character is named: not the brothel-­keeper, not the two prostitutes, not Dubois’s male companion, and not even the cleric who directed them to the brothel in the first place. Neither Dubois nor Jan de Witte appears amidst the fifteenth-­century sources that remain in Bruges’ city archives.15...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2003) 33 (3): 419–435.
Published: 01 September 2003
... Christian legend as a repentant prostitute. Further, “the sinful woman is also Eve, the mother of all the living, and therefore the image is of Every- man, of the human race alienated from the love of God.” More particularly, continues Ward, these are stories told by monks for monks; using...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2004) 34 (1): 41–64.
Published: 01 January 2004
... property rights. It did not affect their access to concubines and prostitutes and assured lack of punishment for the rape of lower-status females or female captives, as Hrotsvit’s stories amply illustrate.11 The practice of celibacy was astutely exploited by aristocrats in negotiations of power...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2009) 39 (3): 511–544.
Published: 01 September 2009
... keeping with prostitutes and immodest women; and none are more expensive in their adornment than those whose honor is cheap.8 An ethical question inevitably arises: If elaborate dress is such evidence of depravity, why devote an entire book to illustrating it? Feyerabend’s...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2009) 39 (1): 161–181.
Published: 01 January 2009
... they represent. But Gazet’s pictures fraudulently present cour- tesans and prostitutes as royalty, thereby undermining the authenticity of the feminine purity at the center of the European court. In reality these women are imposters — prostitutes — whose bodies are bought and sold in an economy...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2002) 32 (1): 1–15.
Published: 01 January 2002
... power or—in Bourdieu’s term, cultural capital —and is ripe for appropriation for a new purpose.33 In another example of appropriation of powerful symbols, Joëlle Rollo-Koster maps out the creation and development in fourteenth-century Avignon of convents of repentent prostitutes, the...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2012) 42 (2): 269–305.
Published: 01 May 2012
... remained with their families until marriage; others left home to lodge elsewhere; quite a few migrated from villages to cities. Not all these women remained virgins — some worked as prostitutes; some lost their virginity through rape; some were common- law wives of priests or other men; some took...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2008) 38 (2): 229–252.
Published: 01 May 2008
... visual cultural traditions, the Magdalene was identified through a number of attributes: a red cloak, long, loose hair, tears, a book, or an ointment bottle. These visual clues help identify her as a reformed prostitute — the red cloak and long, unruly hair indicating her past promiscuousness...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2009) 39 (3): 597–617.
Published: 01 September 2009
... systematic manner with the vast body of laws enacted in different European countries. These studies aimed to extract microcosmic information, such as the way they dealt with prostitutes, but were also geared toward the reconstruction of the cultural and political his- tory of the city more generally...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2000) 30 (1): 41–62.
Published: 01 January 2000
... realm of historiogra- phy, it did so not only in an almost casual way—despite its exceptional nature—but also in an entirely distorted fashion. In a legal history of Speyer, Theodor Harster introduced Hetzeldorfer as a prostitute, an interpretation...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2000) 30 (3): 575–599.
Published: 01 September 2000
... werk, multiplie, and privetee of The Canterbury Tales. Jeremy the butler, together with his confederates, the alchemist Subtle and the prostitute Dol Common, has commandeered his master Lovewit’s house in London, abandoned during a visitation of the plague...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2003) 33 (3): 387–402.
Published: 01 September 2003
... apophthegmata in which dead monks are revealed to be women are spare. For example, the Life of Pelagia explains why its heroine chose to disguise herself as a man: a reformed actress and “prostitute, ” she sought to escape her wealth and notoriety in Antioch for a life of ascetic anonymity. “She held her...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2013) 43 (3): 573–597.
Published: 01 September 2013
...), and pleads, “What shall I do when he is gone?” (1.205). Firk characteristically sexualizes her predicament, suggesting that Jane may be forced to prostitute herself (1.139 – 41). In so doing, she would risk the fate of Mistress Quickly in Henry V, who dies “I’ th’ spital / Of malady of 586...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2002) 32 (3): 543–570.
Published: 01 September 2002
... London represent vice itself. At the same time, these words indicate that by wearing these clothes he struts vice in, that is, he brings it, and evil, into the city. But the foppish man’s choice of clothes and his accompanying prostitute suggest another disease: syphilis. The fabric from which...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2014) 44 (2): 429–451.
Published: 01 May 2014
.... $75.00, paper 45.00. Salkeld, Duncan. Shakespeare among the Courtesans: Prostitution, Literature, and Drama, 1500 – 1650. Anglo-­Italian Renaissance Studies Series. Farn- ham, Surrey: Ashgate, 2012. xiv, 206 pp.; 9 illus. $99.95. Schalkwyk, David. Hamlet’s Dreams: The Robben Island Shakespeare...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2002) 32 (3): 493–518.
Published: 01 September 2002
... marked as a prostitute.7 Men, on the other hand, came and went freely without social stigma (other than that of drunkenness).8 To this gender divide we shall return. In addition to being a communal, if predominantly “male,” space, the alehouse was also (if somewhat paradoxically) a home...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2018) 48 (1): 61–78.
Published: 01 January 2018
..., allegedly because she had refused to prostitute herself. He was eventually beheaded and anatomized as well (GH 191v). Handsch and the Helmstedt Anonymus recorded two further pub- lic anatomies, both on male bodies, performed by Gabriele Falloppia. One “anatomia publica” started on January 7...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2009) 39 (3): 619–641.
Published: 01 September 2009
...” decoration. Coupled with the image of a Roman courtesan on folio 24r (see fig. 4) who wears the white veil regulated by Roman officials as a sign of the prostitute, “Ioannes Phillippus Grekh a Kochendorff” leaves 628  Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies / 39.3 / 2009 Figure 3. Two...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2000) 30 (1): 5–40.
Published: 01 January 2000
... nature and conditions of women.”42 There are, to be sure, a few invocations of women’s authority: the pseudo-Albertan author refers to “quedam meretrices docte” [certain learned prostitutes] and “meretrices et alie mulieres docte” [prostitutes and other...