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property law

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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2021) 51 (3): 453–473.
Published: 01 September 2021
..., Lincolnshire at Ashby Heath. In these instances, perambulators used the occasion of the public recognition of property boundaries as an opportunity to stage a complaint in an act of “performative law.” The complainants asserted their rights and liberties by means of a theatrical form that invited participants...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2002) 32 (1): 1–15.
Published: 01 January 2002
... or artifacts, history and ways of knowl- edge” were then taken up within cultural property law.18 This binary model of cultural appropriation, which was dominant during the 1980s, provoked theoretical resistence by the late 1980s from those who argued that it silenced the “other.” In “Problems...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2009) 39 (2): 407–432.
Published: 01 May 2009
... than victimization. This revisionist impulse has produced impressive work indicating that early modern women were active in spheres from which their exclusion had been largely taken for granted.7 One notable case is women’s relation to property. English cover- ture laws, which restricted...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2012) 42 (2): 461–486.
Published: 01 May 2012
..., war — must make ready the nation to be inscribed with a new system of plantation. Within Irenius’s plan, like Plato’s, this fantasy of absolute erasure is both private and public, targeting culture, language, law, religion, family, governance, and property to outline what Ireland “now...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2013) 43 (3): 545–571.
Published: 01 September 2013
... and a liberty, and its governance of St. Martin’s was independent of other jurisdictions, exempt from the dictates of the City, the bishop of London, and even in some senses the king’s law.2 St. Mar- tin’s privileges were, however, hotly contested by the City of London. The City especially resented...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2000) 30 (2): 275–308.
Published: 01 May 2000
... respecting them.”35 Glanville notes that the king’s acquiescence stems from more than his desiring to be agreeable. Clearly, Henry sensed the possibility of dire consequences if he defied cus- tom. Glanville’s “customary rights” concern matters of property, and a large part of the common law is devoted...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2002) 32 (1): 109–144.
Published: 01 January 2002
... of Provençal law, women rarely divested their properties. The Repenties also received from Pope Gregory XI’s good will various bequests left vacant in their succession, especially for the year 1375–76. During these years, wills from clerics lacking inheritors reverted to the Apostolic Chamber, which...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2013) 43 (1): 173–190.
Published: 01 January 2013
... the landscapes of cus- tom and stewardship to that of property. Whereas land had once been seen as a shared arena for fulfilling social responsibilities by engaging in time-­ honored activities, “the ‘law of property’ champion[ed] the rights of individ- uals to develop and expand their own resources, free...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2004) 34 (3): 473–522.
Published: 01 September 2004
... and Engels saw most economic laws as specifi c to particular societies (25:135–36; 35:625– 26), they regarded the correspondence of society’s relations of production or forms of property to the level of development of its productive forces as a 474 Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies / 34.3...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2002) 32 (2): 305–326.
Published: 01 May 2002
... A. Prendergast College of Wooster Wooster, Ohio “What God hath conjoined then, let no man separate.” I am the husband, and all the whole island is my lawful wife; I am the head, and it is my body; I am the shepherd, and it is my flock. —James I1...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2002) 32 (2): 227–268.
Published: 01 May 2002
.... At times, they indicate that the saint risks violation because of her purity; at others, they illustrate how her sovereignty affords her the right to defend her properties, even through violence. By aligning themselves with the royal saint, whether she is imagined as a victim or as an aggressor...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2001) 31 (1): 39–56.
Published: 01 January 2001
... was a nativus —“born unfree.” Kin solidarities were central in shaping patterns of property, power, and violence. To people who 44 Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies / 31.1 / 2001 JMEMS31.1-02 Bartlett 2/26/01 6:56 PM Page 45 constantly saw the fate...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2003) 33 (1): 1–21.
Published: 01 January 2003
... liberal arts, before proceeding to the study of theology or repairing to Bologna for instruction in law. Within a generation or so, it had been established that only a student who had been accepted by his masters as one of themselves could be granted the bishop’s indispensable licence to teach...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2017) 47 (1): 147–166.
Published: 01 January 2017
... of Medieval and Early Modern Studies / 47.1 / 2017 it was intended to improve upon local, customary law in the Low Coun- tries, prey to the whims of local officials — town aldermen with rudimen- tary legal training who sat regularly in special sessions to consider property and personal conflicts. Every...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2002) 32 (2): 327–342.
Published: 01 May 2002
... ebenine; blanc pieds : gresles & petits) are merely inverse properties or descriptive categories rather than gendered oppositions. The law of gram- mar and genre provided sufficient resistance to Pasquier’s appeal to nature. Des Roches’s utterances riddled by citations challenged her guest’s parasiti...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2002) 32 (3): 519–542.
Published: 01 September 2002
... the Renaissance as the time at which the mirror ceased to be invested with magical properties and instead became emblematic of the modern subject. In his compendious study, The Mutable Glass: Mirror-Imagery in Titles and Texts of the Middle Ages and English Renaissance, Herbert Grabes claims that between...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2012) 42 (2): 421–459.
Published: 01 May 2012
...: Moses and the Law: Balaack and Balaam, performed by the cap- 422 Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies / 42.2 / 2012 pers or cap- makers. It not only tells the story of Moses but also introduces the memorable character of a talking ass. Alarmed by the Israelites’ defeat of other pagan...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2007) 37 (2): 335–371.
Published: 01 May 2007
... / The Giant’s Faction  347 tell’s brother-in-law and uncle to Heywood’s wife, Joan. Though Heywood’s work proposes a small-producer radicalism, not Utopia’s communism, it too provides a materialist analysis of the origin of class society, attacks heredi- tary property and the cult of blood, and imagines...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2013) 43 (1): 71–98.
Published: 01 January 2013
.... Also in use was the stage property called a “traverse,” a curtained structure that could be moved around the stage as the action demanded, a sort of moveable discovery space. Other productions, such as the court performance of Jonson’s Bartholomew Fair, employed canvas booths (and probably...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2004) 34 (1): 41–64.
Published: 01 January 2004
... was firmly tied to procreativity in its dual aspects of either legitimately continuing bloodlines or wreaking havoc through dynastic politics that could lead to a rival’s ascent to power. Men’s sexuality was restricted only insofar as it impinged on other men’s property rights. It did not affect...