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print and performativity

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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2021) 51 (1): 79–104.
Published: 01 January 2021
... Romae (1494). Composed in the popular cantare verse form, which was strongly associated with public performance, these works are an unusual example of printed guides to Rome aimed specifically at an Italian audience. Situating Dati’s cantari within the broader culture of the Roman pilgrimage...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2021) 51 (3): 431–451.
Published: 01 September 2021
... a real constituency of speakers voicing such complaints. St. German countered More's critique by incorporating a dialogue between the characters Salem and Bizance that conflated the reading of his printed works with the speaking and sharing of their political concerns. Although the role of performance...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2021) 51 (3): 509–531.
Published: 01 September 2021
... rhetoric and compulsion to independent judgment of truth. Copyright © 2021 by Duke University Press 2021 early modern mountebanks itinerant performers medical practitioners performance studies audience response In 1559, an apparently new word emerged in English print: mountebank...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2020) 50 (3): 633–657.
Published: 01 September 2020
... of post-Reformation apocalyptic drama and, more immediately, as participating in the extended print and performance history of the confessionally charged Jacobean history play. Combining an apocalyptic vision of history and chivalric language and imagery within a cultural framework of Elizabethan...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2021) 51 (3): 577–585.
Published: 01 September 2021
... and manufacture of paper, which made writing easier and reading cheaper, coupled with the introduction of print technology after 1455; the upheaval of the Protestant Reformation and its Catholic counterpart, and the bloody aftermath of religious wars, persecutions, and witch hunts that (re)shaped performance...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2020) 50 (3): 565–586.
Published: 01 September 2020
... diplomatic custom and ritual secretarial correspondence in manuscript and print performative nature of diplomacy Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies 50:3, September 2020 DOI 10.1215/10829636-8626457 © 2020 by Duke University Press Andrew Marvell in Russia: Secretaries, Rhetoric, and Public...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2021) 51 (3): 477–486.
Published: 01 September 2021
... in this case: Jonson's text does not serve to document the event, but to replace an occasion of embodied performance with a literary text. Whither indeed? Given that each of these authors tried to re-present the actual occasion in his own publication, this vexed relationship between print and performance...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2008) 38 (2): 315–344.
Published: 01 May 2008
... was an authenticating condition of civic ceremony. He proceeded by analogy: of scripted character to native inhabit- ant, of performance to print, and of cartographical to humanistic concepts of place. If his methodology of analogy reveals as many gaps as equivalences, it is all the more useful to us...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2020) 50 (1): 181–195.
Published: 01 January 2020
... Foundation Series. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylva- nia Press, 2018. ix, 409 pp.; 12 illus. $59.95. Phillips, Harriet. Nostalgia in Print and Performance, 1510 1613: Merry Worlds. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2019. xi, 239 pp. $99.99. [On the commodification of Merry England by early...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2007) 37 (3): 531–547.
Published: 01 September 2007
..., the decades in which the Whitsun plays were revised and performed coincide with the rapid expansion of audiences for print, especially as a medium for the trans- mission of religious texts.45 Aspects of that print world impinge upon the Chester cycle. For example, the plays’ most frequently recognized...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2015) 45 (2): 245–286.
Published: 01 May 2015
... allusions to politics; and they remain infrequent later. One occurs implicitly in the context of Orff’s often playful correspondence with Hofmann. On June 12, 1936, the composer voiced his view that no one would print and perform his Carmina Burana, because they were “un-­German” [undeutsch].130...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2023) 53 (2): 347–377.
Published: 01 May 2023
... music. This form of notation was not a transcription for future performance but rather a provocation to performance. As a result, musical notation frequently “leaked” into decorative margins. The musical pages of this period display evident delight in melding, blending, and blurring the distinction...
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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2014) 44 (3): 503–529.
Published: 01 September 2014
... present to past. This essay focuses on the afterlife of the East Anglian N-Town plays, exploring the ways that the Cotton Vespasian D.8 manuscript continued to be “performed” (in an extended sense of that word) in ideologies of recusancy and antiquarian possession in the life of its little-known early...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2002) 32 (3): 581–604.
Published: 01 September 2002
... Blackburn, Bonnie J. Composition, Printing, and Performance: Studies in Renaissance Music. Variorum Collected Studies Series, vol. 687. Aldershot, Hampshire: Ashgate Variorum, 2000. x, 338 pp.; several musical examples. $105.95. Duffin, Ross W., ed. A Performer’s Guide to Medieval Music. Music: Schol...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2015) 45 (3): 543–556.
Published: 01 September 2015
...-­and-­white composition, but the individual who performed the cutting and sticking here looked at printed engravings and saw them in color. At first sight of this volume, the explosion of illustration gives prior- ity to the images at the expense of the text, and literary scholars who, like me...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2021) 51 (3): 497–507.
Published: 01 September 2021
...W. B. Worthen What does it mean to think about embodiment without bodies? This essay pursues a question central to all categories of performance—theatrical and extratheatrical—in the early modern period. It explores that question by considering the actions assigned to performers by early modern...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2023) 53 (2): 201–224.
Published: 01 May 2023
... artifact nor the alternative determinacy of its own internal logic. 19 Kiernan considers such ideological interventions to be the unfortunate consequences of the intrinsic, material limitations of print technology. Because print is “an extremely inefficient and inadequate means for representing...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2000) 30 (2): 309–338.
Published: 01 May 2000
... energy to transcribing its transgressive performative utterances into patterned, written formulas of reliable meaning. Reproduced in print, witch-speak acquired a tangible shape which could be condemned, ridiculed, appropriated. Once the witches’ curses were stripped of gesture, voice, expression...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2016) 46 (2): 315–337.
Published: 01 May 2016
... those acts, the Croxton play provides critical distance on the very performance it enacts. Ultimately, it replaces the Passion play with, and judges it inferior to, a more decorous and authoritative processional ritual. Moreover, in presenting a Christian merchant as the catalyst for the Jews' actions...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2018) 48 (1): 1–9.
Published: 01 January 2018
.... Dissection became a performative act that required a large audience and a theater. Such performances turned out to be so successful that they had to be repeated, and an array of books came out, whose fron- tispieces visualized a splayed male or female cadaver, revealing its cavities to a voyeuristic...