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pragmatic reading practice

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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2015) 45 (3): 557–571.
Published: 01 September 2015
... and in the Renaissance, as well as Renaissance writings that explicitly propose the sortes as a mode of reading, this essay argues that the practice, while oracular and prophetic, is linked to a mode of Renaissance pragmatic reading, which is concerned with (figurative) cutting, excerpting, and reaffixing textual...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2003) 33 (2): 215–239.
Published: 01 May 2003
... different communal practices necessarily involve faith, beyond written law. In the De inventione, for example, Cicero shows how an advocate might argue in favor of reading a will according to the intention of its author, and against what the actual words say. This advocate should mount a full-scale...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2020) 50 (3): 609–631.
Published: 01 September 2020
... Hotman s The Ambassa- dor and it testifies to the enduring influence of the Plutarchian humanist reading at the turn of the seventeenth century. Colclough describes Hol- land s translation as a schematic account of the components of a parrhesias- tic relationship and a pragmatic description...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2000) 30 (1): 1–4.
Published: 01 January 2000
... is held secret, whether by oneself or by others. A secret is a psychological event. Foucault argued—in part ahistorically and nostalgically, as Karma Lochrie shows in her recent study of the medieval uses of secrecy—that the medieval practice of confession was formative...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2017) 47 (2): 327–358.
Published: 01 May 2017
... of Richard Plantagenet's extraction from sanctuary at Westminster in The History of Richard III (1557). Moreover, Ford redirects the language of contemporary chroniclers Francis Bacon and Thomas Gainsford in order to emphasize the link between sanctuary and practices of royal pity in the play. By positioning...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2015) 45 (3): 443–456.
Published: 01 September 2015
... that involves opening a bound copy of Virgil and finding prophecy or advice in the verse upon which the eye lands. Myers argues that the practice “found a natural — yet distinct — place in the Renaissance cul- ture of pragmatic reading” in that it represents a search, at one and the same time...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2014) 44 (3): 549–583.
Published: 01 September 2014
... other when sacred objects, images, and practices move into secular spheres. © 2014 by Duke University Press 2014 a Sidney Montagu and the Sacramental Sign: Memorial and Sacred Objects...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2003) 33 (1): 143–177.
Published: 01 January 2003
... at work for figures such as Pico and Ficino) through “symbolic literalism” (seen in such figures as Paracelsus and Fernal), to, finally, the practices of reading nature as an order of con- tingent things, such as in the works of Bacon and Harvey.42 Where exegeti- cal hermeneutics tended analogically...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2014) 44 (1): 187–213.
Published: 01 January 2014
... peoples of Catholic France and “New France”—through the lens of gender. In the case of early modern Atlantic dreaming, gender and its confusions in the social imaginary are not tied to the historical practice of female-bodied persons. The femininity investigated here is positional and symbolic...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2017) 47 (1): 53–73.
Published: 01 January 2017
... to detail. Microhistory practices close reading, looking for nuances in words, actions, and material conditions. That is one thing about it. I catalogue some other things, as follows. A second trait of microhistory is that it insists on the thick connect- edness of things, on scales both small...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2009) 39 (2): 305–330.
Published: 01 May 2009
...Ellen Spolsky Believing that the destruction of church imagery was necessary to the amendment of Christian life, the religious reformers in sixteenth-century England aimed to change minds as well as church furnishings. Image worship was to be replaced by reading, and learning from pictures...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2012) 42 (3): 597–614.
Published: 01 September 2012
... combined with the developments in medieval spirituality that produced an array of lay religious groups during this period, suggests that Cistercian policy considered enclosure to be important symbolically more than pragmatically. Unlike Periculoso , the aim was never unilaterally to confine women...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2011) 41 (2): 293–316.
Published: 01 May 2011
... for a particular church practice known as “prophesying,” the public and philological read- ing of scripture. This state of affairs is alluded to in an otherwise obscure passage at the end of the “Julye” eclogue, when an eagle (symbolizing Eliza- beth) drops a shellfish from a great height onto the head...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2017) 47 (2): 359–390.
Published: 01 May 2017
... distance tables. All are portable, and all map the nation’s topography in easily legible ways. The archival world they reveal is a fascinating one, uncov- ering fresh terrain about reading publics, book trade, and alternative litera- cies.1 Small-­format cartography worked at the intersections of space...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2015) 45 (2): 219–243.
Published: 01 May 2015
... in the Paz / Magic That Works  231 way that they perform that scientia. In the charms, we have seen how medi- cal and agricultural knowledge gained from a patient, pragmatic approach, needed to be performed beyond what was written on the page in a partly poetic, partly practical manner...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2016) 46 (3): 545–554.
Published: 01 September 2016
... be applauded; his reading may likewise be applauded: there are exceptionally useful tracks through entire libraries of books compacted in his notes. On the other hand, the book's ethical purpose (to denigrate the liberal West) profoundly damages the entire project. Gregory's account of the “whatever” culture...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2006) 36 (3): 619–642.
Published: 01 September 2006
... interested in pur- suing the fortunes of curiosity/curiositas on its way to a split identity in the eventually discrete realms of the aesthetic and what we now call the “scien- tific.” The period of developing British interest in a practical (if often allegor- ical) and empirical bee savoir is also...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2007) 37 (3): 595–620.
Published: 01 September 2007
... contextual reading, does “fantasy” necessarily lie “beyond” contextualization? Is it not the case that “context” and “history” are both made available to us through expressions of fantasy and are encoded in them?14 I will suggest the necessary converse of Lupton’s formulation — that an engagement...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2014) 44 (1): 135–161.
Published: 01 January 2014
...David Marno This essay traces shifts in meditative practice from Saint Ignatius of Loyola's Spiritual Exercises to the experimental philosopher Robert Boyle's Occasional Reflections , showing how Boyle's text participates in the evolution of the concept of “attention” as it changes from a spiritual...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2021) 51 (2): 241–262.
Published: 01 May 2021
... arguments based on a close reading of Psellos's account. First, I contend that the passage of time in the duration of this particular miracle, and the miraculous moments it entailed (when the veil raised itself and, later, fell) are posited by Psellos as fundamental factors determining the human ability...