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popular tales of sin and divine retribution

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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2022) 52 (3): 503–531.
Published: 01 September 2022
... afflicted a man caught in bed with another man's wife. 34 jmcrawford@uu.edu © 2022 by Duke University Press 2022 Shakespeare Othello Thomas Beard popular tales of sin and divine retribution conventions of comedy and tragedy Consider this. There once was a priest who took...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2022) 52 (3): 407–413.
Published: 01 September 2022
... of writing about vice, especially in popular tales of divine retribution that draw on conventions of both tragedy and comedy. He takes a close look at the shaping of narratives of come-uppance in a range of texts from true-crime pamphlets to Thomas Beard's Theatre of God's Judgements . Crawford pursues...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2010) 40 (1): 89–117.
Published: 01 January 2010
... 10.1215/10829636-2009-015  © 2010 by Duke University Press use of the word as it was deployed in doctrines of repentance and expiation, which depended on the notion of making enough — satisfying — to a r t ic u- late the possibilities of compensating for sin. Carrying with it the full force of its...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2015) 45 (1): 7–52.
Published: 01 January 2015
... and humanity, and some of this literature Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies 45:1, January 2015 DOI 10.1215/10829636-2830004  © 2015 by Duke University Press would later help shape popular accounts that romanticized some criminals and their executions. More immediately...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2000) 30 (2): 275–308.
Published: 01 May 2000
... and choose “by one assent.” The division, if there is one, lies between the monarch and the subjects, not among the subjects themselves. Rastell thus departs entirely from the Tudor myth by never hinting at divine retribution for the deposition of an anointed monarch or blaming Richard’s murder...