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popular tales of sin and divine retribution

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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2022) 52 (3): 503–531.
Published: 01 September 2022
...; and that Shakespeare responds to exactly these changes when, in his own comedy of judgment, he finds the mechanisms of comic justice collapsing. jmcrawford@uu.edu © 2022 by Duke University Press 2022 Shakespeare Othello Thomas Beard popular tales of sin and divine retribution conventions of comedy...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2022) 52 (3): 407–413.
Published: 01 September 2022
... careful attention to the work of peace, care, and hospitality and perceptions of the good. Jason Crawford's essay takes up a tradition of writing about vice, especially in popular tales of divine retribution that draw on conventions of both tragedy and comedy. He takes a close look at the shaping...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2010) 40 (1): 89–117.
Published: 01 January 2010
... of compensating for sin. Carrying with it the full force of its etymological roots in the Latin satisfacere, to do or to make enough (satis), satisfaction was a pivotal principle in the early periods’ most influ- ential accounts of the nature and scope of human and divine atonement.4 Shakespeare’s jest...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2024) 54 (1): 113–135.
Published: 01 January 2024
... Langbein explains, “Because crime had been equated with sin, and because sin was a matter of the individual's exercise of his free will, it had been essential to devise rules which reflected individual volition.” 45 Interiority as well as exteriority had to be searched for “evidence.” This evinces...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2015) 45 (1): 7–52.
Published: 01 January 2015
... and humanity, and some of this literature Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies 45:1, January 2015 DOI 10.1215/10829636-2830004  © 2015 by Duke University Press would later help shape popular accounts that romanticized some criminals and their executions. More immediately...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2000) 30 (2): 275–308.
Published: 01 May 2000
... the subjects themselves. Rastell thus departs entirely from the Tudor myth by never hinting at divine retribution for the deposition of an anointed monarch or blaming Richard’s murder for the War of the Roses. Clearly, Rastell’s larger purpose is not to endorse the Tudor regime, but to demonstrate...