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politics of trauma

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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2019) 49 (2): 347–376.
Published: 01 May 2019
... University Press 2019 wounding of Henry V Battle of Shrewsbury bodily disfigurement Lancastrian chronicles politics of trauma ...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2014) 44 (2): 321–344.
Published: 01 May 2014
... political philosophy of John Fortescue and George Buchanan. Much more than a broadly gendered metaphor for queenly submission, this language of royal imprisonment derives its legitimacy from discourses that touch upon the very ideological foundations of English and Scottish monarchy. © 2014 by Duke...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2009) 39 (1): 119–141.
Published: 01 January 2009
... Gunpowder Plot rests upon the unexamined splitting off of the figure of the conciliar Spaniard from the figure of the pope, a kind of bastardizing of the image from one of its referents. And one could also argue that the trauma of the Armada wounded that logic to its heart, and made the figure of...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2014) 44 (1): 187–213.
Published: 01 January 2014
...-­meanings are not private, that they are in some sense communal and thus may be, as we will see in examples from early modern Huronia and Iroquoia, binding. Macrobius’s Commentary on the Dream of Scipio — which liter- ary dream concludes Cicero’s classic work of Roman political science, De...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2001) 31 (3): 561–584.
Published: 01 September 2001
... Donne and Herbert.3 If these writers look toward the scene of the Passion, however, they do so through squinting eyes amid slumping postures, as if they were glimpsing a trauma too immense for human comprehension. The poems explored in this essay—Donne’s “Goodfriday, 1613,” Herbert’s...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2011) 41 (3): 463–485.
Published: 01 September 2011
... parallel’s the Gesta Francorum description of Pirus, a Turkish emir who had entered into negotiations with Bohemond during the truce of Antioch (His- toria Iherosolimitana, 3:796 – 97). However, in Robert’s account the two men focus on theological conversations, rather than shifting political...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2014) 44 (3): 503–529.
Published: 01 September 2014
... religious politics?33 The mystery deepens with what Philip Pattenden calls the “pious fraud” reported by John Brough Taylor in his 1816 edition of Hegge’s Legend of St. Cuthbert — that Anne Swifte’s postmortem inventory shows that Hegge’s grandmother owned what Taylor describes as a “figure of Sent...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2009) 39 (2): 305–330.
Published: 01 May 2009
... most useful connections. Synaptic plasticity, that is, the ability of the brain to build its connections in response to its environment and then to restructure itself in the face of changing external circumstances, or repair itself after illness or trauma, is, in principle, universal. But it is...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2016) 46 (1): 141–165.
Published: 01 January 2016
... same time, Bolton also had a strong sense that the actual, personal bodily chemistry of pious believ- ers could protect them against psychological trauma. “I am persuaded,” he asserts in a work of 1631, that “the very same measure of melancholic mat- ter” which would prompt “ghastly fears” and...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2017) 47 (2): 255–277.
Published: 01 May 2017
... withstand various traumas, while psychological hardening consists of suppressing impulses like empathy, pity, 256  Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies / 47.2 / 2017 compassion, and tolerance, even while intensifying and then harnessing other ones like anger, indifference, and pitilessness...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2011) 41 (3): 545–576.
Published: 01 September 2011
... of this community were involved in the scheme and whether they had some Old Christian collabora- tors.16 Whoever they were, the forgers did their work in the shadow of the traumas that had afflicted Granada’s Moriscos in the 1560s and 1570s. In 1567, Granada’s officials had attempted to...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2000) 30 (3): 449–462.
Published: 01 September 2000
...- nial civil service, preservation of the national archive, politics of appointment to endowed professorships, curricular reform, and the cultural production of academic publishing. Consider the English case—the field of modern history was first legislated as an...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2001) 31 (3): 477–506.
Published: 01 September 2001
... remarks date (the late 1980s and early 1990s) was devoted first to ferreting out the irony that underscores much troubadour poetry and then to demystifying the gender politics of courtly love.11 The strategy behind these critical moves was deliberate and largely political. Dissatisfied with the...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2000) 30 (2): 247–274.
Published: 01 May 2000
... Juno” (43– 44) ends with him. For a medieval audience, Orfeo’s lack of an heir of his flesh effectively undermines all his other achievements.8 To regard the steward as a surrogate son is merely to gloss Orfeo’s personal and political defeat with euphemistic varnish.9 How, then, should this...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2001) 31 (1): 113–146.
Published: 01 January 2001
... East, as well as in Iberia, Western Christianity had a long experience of het- erogeneous cultures. Some were clearly allied by kinship, affinity, geography, political expedience, religion; others existed in bitter competition amongst themselves and with their...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2006) 36 (2): 291–319.
Published: 01 May 2006
... Lévi-Strauss’s scheme for the movement of myth. He makes the point himself: “This formula becomes highly significant when we recall that Freud considered that two traumas . . . are necessary in order to generate the individual myth in which a neurosis consists.”20 The point can be illustrated...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2005) 35 (2): 245–288.
Published: 01 May 2005
... other Castilian cities and court sites. In the second half of the fi fteenth century, Castile endured a long political crisis characterized by frequent out- breaks of rampant violence. Th is chronic state of emergency led the central state power to display propagandistic images of royal sovereignty...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2006) 36 (3): 539–560.
Published: 01 September 2006
... economic, religious, and military cri- ses. It does so by erecting protean “modalities of cultural fantasy” capable of changing form and direction in order to accommodate historical trauma, contradiction, and what she calls “memorial transfiguration.” This rescue mission is for Heng particularly...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2003) 33 (2): 335–351.
Published: 01 May 2003
... Brereley and the Grindletonians in the 1630s was replaced by the much greater trauma of the Civil War in the following decade, but the significance of Grindleton was remembered by some of the 336 Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies / 33.2 / 2003 church historians of the period, the most...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2000) 30 (2): 309–338.
Published: 01 May 2000
... the monarchy. It was diffused throughout the communal, political, and judi- cial structures of early modern England. The pamphlet’s popular “texts of horror,” then, intertwined two thrilling stories. In one of these stories, zealous Elizabethan reformers impressed upon their unredeemed...