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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2021) 51 (3): 497–507.
Published: 01 September 2021
... plays, how the interplay of writing-as-algorithm with known bodily practices might enable interpreters to use the plays to assess the limits and purposes of commodified embodiment—acting—as means to a wider, historical understanding of embodiment. Attending to the embodiment implied by cue-scripts...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2021) 51 (3): 577–585.
Published: 01 September 2021
... productive methodology for extracting real information about early modern historical bodies from the scripts that created fictive bodies to be played by now-dead actors. Worthen has, it seems to me, identified a moment of real rupture by defining what makes the “algorithm” of early modern dramatic...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2021) 51 (1): 105–139.
Published: 01 January 2021
...; it is an irregular attempt to produce a calligraphic display script, with gothic spacing and many gothic forms, but some secretary features as well.14 Although one may find in the rest of the volume occasional examples of attempts to emulate elements of gothic dis- play script in rubrics and headers...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2021) 51 (3): 587–600.
Published: 01 September 2021
..., 2018. x, 342 pp. $55.00. Sullivan, Ceri. Shakespeare and the Play Scripts of Private Prayer . Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2020. xiii, 247 pp., 7 figs. $80.00. Van Pelt, Nadia Thérèse. Drama in Medieval and Early Modern Europe: Playmakers and Their Strategies . Themes in Medieval...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2008) 38 (2): 315–344.
Published: 01 May 2008
... of Florida) for which a script survives.3 “Le Theatre de Neptune” is also a product of the colony in New France, which was abandoned in 1607, as its shareholders’ economic monopoly came to an end. Following the colo- nists’ return to France, Lescarbot published “Le Theatre de Neptune” in Les Muses de...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2013) 43 (2): 335–367.
Published: 01 May 2013
... of liturgical books that could not otherwise be staged. The visual features of such books, the effi- cacious language they script, and the supernatural acts they enable forge a direct correspondence between magic and the Mass, a connection Marlowe pursues throughout the play. 338  Journal...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2013) 43 (1): 25–48.
Published: 01 January 2013
... circumstances, a rough indication of characterological space can be found in the proportion of lines (and hence of stage time) that a character commands. Thus Hamlet is scripted to speak thirty-­eight percent of the lines in the play, Lear twenty-­one percent, Prospero twenty-­nine per- cent.17...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2013) 43 (2): 303–334.
Published: 01 May 2013
... to “verray pite and . . . wommanhede” (3.4639), her reaction is already scripted by his demonstrative subservience. Criseyde knows her part, and plays the generous beloved exactly as Diomede desires. To his messenger she replies: Ful wommanly bad hym repeire ageyn Vn-­to his lord...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2021) 51 (3): 431–451.
Published: 01 September 2021
... to understand them as occasions for readers’ production of authentic speech through repetition. As with theatrical performances, in which “the live act succeeds, surrogates, or comes after a precedent textual script,” the reading of a dialogue serves as “a record of the text set in play ,” as opposed...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2003) 33 (2): 281–309.
Published: 01 May 2003
... of Michael Jones’s essay is the first fascinating speculation about the play’s Protestant future, the first Lawton / Sacrilege and Theatricality 293 half mounts a case for a primary legal reference in the play’s script. This is largely based on a reading of two words...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2015) 45 (3): 635–637.
Published: 01 September 2015
.... Manuscripts should not exceed 10,000 words inclusive of notes. Illustrations accompanying a manu- script should ideally be submitted in the form of TIFF digital files and must be provided with permissions for their reproduction. For return of manu- scripts, please include an SASE. We do not consider...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2015) 45 (2): 245–286.
Published: 01 May 2015
....24 In such a double house collaboration between the male makers of the Codex Buranus and one or more female artists play- ing an auxiliary role is conceivable along the lines of the precedent set at Strasbourg in 1154 by the nun and painter Guta, who worked together with the priest and copyist...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2000) 30 (2): 185–210.
Published: 01 May 2000
... as it applies to medieval manu- scripts.5 Yet house arrest, as I conceive it, is not merely a matter of the phys- ical incarceration of manuscripts, but also of their entanglement in a web of assumptions about what is extratextual or uninteresting and, therefore, irrelevant—to all but the wild-eyed...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2015) 45 (3): 523–542.
Published: 01 September 2015
..., and even collaborative scholarship. Renaissance literary and cultural historians have found substantial links already between sewing and intellectual work. Linda Woodbridge has traced the rhetoric of “play patching” to refer to plot borrowing in controversies over early dra- matic publication...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2014) 44 (3): 503–529.
Published: 01 September 2014
..., scholar, and possessor of the N-­Town plays, signs the letter “Your very loving friend Robert Hegge” and dates it June 3, 1629. The letter to Henry is written in a hasty or agitated script that looks almost nothing like Hegge’s usual handwriting or the careful address and postal instructions...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2021) 51 (3): 487–495.
Published: 01 September 2021
... focus on explicit references to plays—and then bemoan the lack of evidence. But what if we move beyond performance as the enactment of scripted drama? By examining not only stage presentation but also quotidian, ceremonial, and ritual practices, we can more readily see unexpected performance traces...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2013) 43 (1): 145–172.
Published: 01 January 2013
...; and Romeo’s decision to play the torchbearer — touches on an ele- ment of the real, taken as the site of an impasse, dilemma, or resistance that reveals the vexed and provisional character of hospitable scripts. The servingmen demonstrate the necessity of labor to build and furnish scenes of public...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2015) 45 (3): 457–485.
Published: 01 September 2015
... is divided between published and unpublished texts), this arrangement can be frustrating, not to mention tiring; and we may find ourselves dreaming of a special reading room in the middle, devoted to books that sit somewhere between script and print — with a sound-­proof annex, perhaps, for scholars...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2021) 51 (3): 533–551.
Published: 01 September 2021
... and the charges against him as a rapist? This essay argues that long before Lambe gives those around him a basis for violence, he triggers anxieties about what he is, and that these anxieties play a role in the violence against him. The text of A Briefe Description demonstrates the way mechanisms of justice...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2003) 33 (2): 261–280.
Published: 01 May 2003
... If this is the criticism, Practicing New Historicism, one of the works under scrutiny here, is the riposte. Here, Greenblatt looks back over his shoul- der—at his own past practices, and at the play, Hamlet, that preeminently gazes behind.5 In Practicing New Historicism, Greenblatt both places New Historicism...