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physiology of the heart

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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2016) 46 (1): 33–59.
Published: 01 January 2016
...Clarissa Chenovick Henry of Lancaster's Livre de Seyntz Medicines is a vividly medicalized penitential narrative composed by a leading lay nobleman of fourteenth-century England. Grounded in the physiology of the medieval heart, Lancaster's understudied Livre demonstrates how medieval medical...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2016) 46 (1): 141–165.
Published: 01 January 2016
... body and heart, and then I explore contemporary attempts to detail the physiology of the crucified Christ. Before doing this it will help to give some working definitions of the spirits of the Christian body, and then to sketch out their relation to the Bible and to classical cosmology...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2016) 46 (1): 1–5.
Published: 01 January 2016
... how praying and preaching actually made people feel physically different, discussing the sensual experience of devotion and the “physiological turmoil” caused by intense spiritual activity as he explores the physiology of bodily spirits in the early modern body and soul. While the early modern...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2013) 43 (2): 247–273.
Published: 01 May 2013
... Thornton was just eighteen years old when she fell sick from sorrow over her sister, and she was only twenty-­four when George died — ages at which the heart was particularly vulnerable to the effects of emotions. Yet, as we shall see, her accounts of immediate, mimetic illness reflect a common...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2018) 48 (1): 61–78.
Published: 01 January 2018
...” of the different parts, that is, what we call physiology today, was also an essential aspect of anatomical inquiry and teaching in sixteenth-­century Padua. Some of the explanations were not directly related to or based on precise knowledge of anatomical structures. Falloppia’s account of the heart...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2018) 48 (1): 105–124.
Published: 01 January 2018
... of the cornerstones of the anatomical revolution. As anatomists dissect away, ever more convinced of the importance of using their own hands, the complexities of the physiology of the human hand are revealed to them. This essay focuses on Andreas Vesalius’s exploration of the mysteries of the human hand. In his work...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2012) 42 (3): 539–566.
Published: 01 September 2012
... in the Flaming Heart, “I was sufficiently recollected, and in my Oratorie” when “there came a Rapt of Spirit vpon me, with such an excessiue impulse, or impetuositie, that there was no power in me, to resist it. It seemed to me, that I was carried vp, and placed in Heauen.” Events took “so short a space...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2016) 46 (2): 213–231.
Published: 01 May 2016
... texts from Galen that show his view of physiology to be thoroughly Aristotelian, grounded as it is on the distinction between actuality and potentiality. On this basis, Linacre rejects the standard rhetorical approach to the moods as “affections of the mind,” preferring instead a philosophical view...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2008) 38 (3): 413–442.
Published: 01 September 2008
.... The defluxion might pour into the heart and provoke spasms and palpitations; or into the stomach and 422  Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies / 38.3 / 2008 intestines, wreaking havoc with the digestion, provoking vomiting or diar- rhea; or into the womb, and cause the menses to turn white...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2001) 31 (1): 113–146.
Published: 01 January 2001
... marked by skin color in its relation to physiology and character; to argue that medieval constructions of race included the knowledge that a “biolog- ical” truth of the body is produced (and sustained) through repetitive acts of representation, so that this truth could...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2013) 43 (3): 623–653.
Published: 01 September 2013
...Christine A. Jones An artisanal practice with no domestic precedent in the seventeenth century, hot beverages had a dubious charm for Europeans. Unlike mirror-making and ceramics, the craft of the “coffee-man” resulted in something new that was edible and that proved physiologically surprising...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2018) 48 (2): 341–364.
Published: 01 May 2018
... Modern Studies 48:2, May 2018 DOI © 2018 by Duke University Press ern world. However, the apocalyptic was only one category within a much larger epistemic frame of reference that provided justi cation for divine revelations as a source of truth. At the heart of the way that early modern...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2008) 38 (3): 493–521.
Published: 01 September 2008
... In short, physical capacity and physical integrity often determined one’s right to participate in civic activities of many kinds. Curiously, how- ever, and although such legal issues lay at the heart of early modern dis- cussions of bodies, whether defective, ambiguous...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2018) 48 (1): 11–40.
Published: 01 January 2018
... is . . . an instrument of teaching and of separating reality” and that the “name-­maker” is also a “lawgiver, who is of all artisans the rarest.” At the heart of the Platonic debate over names was the question as to whether a given name was intrinsic to the thing named, or part of an arbitrary system...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2018) 48 (1): 153–182.
Published: 01 January 2018
... involving Guyon (the titular Knight of Temperance), Arthur, Alma, and the affections. The knights accompany Alma to the heart where they meet the affections and come to recognize themselves in two of the women there. At this point, Spenser naturalizes the invasion of the pas- sions previously...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2002) 32 (3): 543–570.
Published: 01 September 2002
... braine-sick head, not to comliness and decorum.”18 The point might be further pressed to suggest that possessing a “touch” of these nations is likened to being physiologically contaminated by them. The full title of Dekker’s aforementioned pamphlet displays the notion that sinful behavior...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2008) 38 (3): 559–587.
Published: 01 September 2008
... a devastating if hyperbolic description of lepers: [They are] men already dead except to sin; often dumb, with festering bodies whose insensible limbs rotted off them; heart- breaking and horrifying spectacles of human ruin; objects of 562  Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2020) 50 (2): 269–291.
Published: 01 May 2020
...: Juliana describes idols as thes feondes fetles [vessels of the Fiend] and declares that cwike deovlen doth ham- thrin [liv- ing devils set themselves inside of them] (Juliene 19.2, 24.3). Similarly, Mar- garet scorns the idols of Olibrius, declaring that the unsehene unwihtes wunieth ham inwith...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2015) 45 (2): 367–393.
Published: 01 May 2015
..., Plato credits Homer with the origination of this metaphor: “When a person’s mental wax is deep, plentiful, smooth and worked to the right consistency, 370  Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies / 45.2 / 2015 then whatever enters by means of the senses and makes marks on the ‘heart...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2018) 48 (1): 41–59.
Published: 01 January 2018
... anatomicae secundum Galeni sententiam libri quatuor (Principles of Anatomy according to the Opinion of Galen), a revision of a textbook writ- ten by his teacher Johann Guinter.1 The two publications complement each other. One provides a visual map of Vesalius’s anatomical and physiological knowledge...