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parliament

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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2013) 43 (2): 393–417.
Published: 01 May 2013
...Brett F. Parker In 1604, the Elizabethan Society of Antiquaries examined three components of King James’s proposed Anglo-Scottish union: the unity of name, law, and Parliament. As members of the Society reconstructed English history in their papers, a variety of historical and constitutional...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2000) 30 (2): 275–308.
Published: 01 May 2000
... live (656).19 Moreover, the gentlemen in Parliament and the _EnD_rich merchants were not the only groups who considered the king’s demands outrageous. When Parliament prorogued after acquiescing to some of Henry’s financial demands, “the common people saied to the Burgesses, sirs, we heare saie you...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2010) 40 (3): 463–495.
Published: 01 September 2010
... democratic element by the parliament, so, in the church, the monarchical element was provided by Christ, the aristo- cratic element by “the ancients and pastors that govern in common,” and the democratic element by the residual authority left to the people who, under the presbyterian dispensation...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2007) 37 (3): 549–577.
Published: 01 September 2007
... reputable point of entry for the opinions of commons came, of course, with the rise of Commons in Parliament, as reflected in the institution of the “commons petition,” in which matters of concern to the parliamentary strata might be introduced by the formula prie la commune (or, occasionally...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2001) 31 (2): 283–312.
Published: 01 May 2001
... advisors from the gentry and nobility. Using similar terms, the Speaker of the House Sir John Puckering carried Parliament’s complaints to Elizabeth: “Mercie now in this case towards her, would in the ende proue crueltie against vs all, Nam est...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2001) 31 (2): 379–408.
Published: 01 May 2001
... to the stake.”27 It had then been confirmed when that other troublesome Mary, Mary Stuart, allegedly conspired to blow up her husband. The Gunpowder Plot, with its ambitious plan to explode the House of Parliament while in session, thus killing James I...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2010) 40 (3): 425–438.
Published: 01 September 2010
... Parliament was a crucial agent. We do well to remember the clas- sic study of English state formation by Philip Corrigan and Derek Sayer, The Great Arch. Its first chapter shows how “England’s precocious central- ization around a comparatively strong crown limited the ‘parcelization of sovereignty...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2011) 41 (2): 393–416.
Published: 01 May 2011
... Spiritualitie, the representative of the clergy in the mock parliament, refuses to stop strain- ing the dowry market by marrying its bishops’ illegitimate daughters into the nobility and polluting aristocratic bloodlines.4 As articulated in early- ­sixteenth-­century humanist texts on husbandry and home...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2012) 42 (3): 511–517.
Published: 01 September 2012
... text in the manuscript is an imperfect version of Geoffrey Chaucer’s Parliament of Fowls.3 The works in Laud Misc. 416 thus comprise a fairly tidy thematic package; as David Lorenzo Boyd notes, the texts attend to “socio-­political discourse” emphasizing common profit.4 Who, though, was...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2004) 34 (2): 279–308.
Published: 01 May 2004
.... Valentine’s Day indebted to Chaucer’s Parliament of Fowls and its critique of the aristocratic game of love and marriage. Clanvowe’s interrogation of this matrimonial game firmly establishes the problematic within the realm of cross-sex erotic desire while excluding any mention of same-sex relations that...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2004) 34 (2): 405–438.
Published: 01 May 2004
... to a Quaker petition against tithes presented to Parliament in 1659.”21 Like their male-authored counterparts, autobiographies by sectar- ian women often function as conversion narratives that depend for their effectiveness on the rhetorically astute public display of inner spiritual tur...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2012) 42 (3): 635–655.
Published: 01 September 2012
...- ligence from her own correspondents in England and on the Continent, which she relayed to Mordaunt.4 In April 1660, when Mordaunt’s position as a prominent royalist negotiator was on the wane, Lady Mordaunt tirelessly plied him with news about General Monck, the Parliament, and the need for Prince...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2009) 39 (2): 433–454.
Published: 01 May 2009
... in the Eleventh and Twelfth Centuries. Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2008. 205 pp.; 9 maps, 5 figs. $75.00. Giancarlo, Matthew. Parliament and Literature in Late Medieval England. Cambridge Studies in Medieval Literature. Cambridge: Cambridge Uni- versity Press, 2007. xiii, 289 pp. $95.00...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2017) 47 (1): 193–198.
Published: 01 January 2017
... Elizabeth I, concerned with her would-­be “issue,” an heir to the English throne — as is expressed in her first speech to Parliament — is examined in parallel with detailed close readings of fifteenth-­century plays about the Virgin Mary and a play contemporary with Elizabeth I about rebellion and...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2000) 30 (2): 247–274.
Published: 01 May 2000
... lords are to elect a new king in the event of his death, best makes sense in the wake of “the revolutionary events of January 1327, when Parliament forced Edward II from his throne.” Analogies between a martyred Edward II and Orfeo have been elaborated further by Edward Kennedy, and recently Chris...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2017) 47 (1): 121–146.
Published: 01 January 2017
... tandem with her mind.31 The active influence of the mind-­womb connection is particularly visible in the N-­Town Mary play Parliament of Heaven, when the Father, Son, and Holy Ghost prepare Gabriel to inform Mary that she has been chosen to host the Son of God in her womb. In response to...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2003) 33 (2): 215–239.
Published: 01 May 2003
... judi- ciary exemplifies this last case. English judges are expected to execute the laws made by a sovereign parliament; this division of power extends, as it must, to matters of interpretation, since judges do not legislate, but rather enforce legislation. Acutely aware of the invasive tendencies of...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2003) 33 (2): 353–378.
Published: 01 May 2003
...., ed. The Cambridge Companion to Cervantes. Cam- bridge Companions to Literature. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002. xvii, 242 pp.; 3 plates. $60.00, paper $22.00. Cruickshanks, Eveline, Stuart Handley, and D. W. Hayton, eds. The His- tory of Parliament: The House of Commons, 1690–1715. 5...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2006) 36 (3): 493–516.
Published: 01 September 2006
...-century French romances, to Chaucer’s Legend of Good Women, House of Fame, and Parliament of Fowls, to Christine de Pizan’s Book of the City of Ladies, to Marlowe’s Tragedie of Dido, Dido functions as the site of this cosmic pathos. By the nineteenth century, Carthage itself would become the site...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2006) 36 (2): 291–319.
Published: 01 May 2006
... justices did not visit Cheshire, the king did not call upon inhabitants for military service, and the county was not subject to royal taxation.51 The great council of the Black Prince would take the place of a parliament in Cheshire, which had its own “Magna Carta,” confirmed six times between 1259...